Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowships

In 2010, the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, with the support of the Robert and Margaret Rothman Endowment for the Humanities, began a program to award summer fellowships to tenure-track and tenured faculty in the humanities disciplines. The objective of these fellowships is to allow recipients to make significant progress on existing creative/research projects during the summer months.

2018-2019 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellows
2017-2018 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellows
2016-2017 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellows
2015-2016 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellows
2014-2015 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellows
2013-2014 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellows
2012-2013 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellows
2011-2012 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellows
2010-2011 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellows


2018–2019

  • Robert Chauca

    Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies
    2018 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellow

    Dr. Chauca received a Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to finish conducting research for my current book project titled “Missionary Polemics and the Making of Early Modern Amazonian Knowledge”, which is under contract with Routledge’s Studies in Global Latin America Series. Thanks to the Rothman fellowship, Dr. Chauca was able to travel to Rome, Italy to work at the central archives of the Franciscan and Jesuit Orders.

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  • Margaret Butler

    School of Music
    2018 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellow

    Dr. Butler received a Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship for her  project titled “The Operatic Prima Donna and Celebrity Culture.” She traveled to the Newberry Library in  Chicago, IL for archival research to consult the Howard Mayer Brown Collection of opera librettos, the rich holdings of manuscript musical scores on microfilm, and contemporary conduct manuals for women.

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  • Jessica Harland-Jacobs

    Department of History
    2018 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellow

    Dr. Harland-Jacobs received a Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship for her  project titled “The Catholic Question and the British Empire, 1710s-1830s.” She used the funds to write the last chapter of the manuscript, and put the entire first draft of the book through a final revision before submitting.

    Harland-Jacobs’ research focused on how early-modern and modern empires managed religious diversity and established the boundaries of imperial citizenship. She posited a “spectrum of incorporation” wherein the ways in which attitudes and policies toward people were incorporated into an expanding empire ranged from persecution to accommodation. To make this case, Harland-Jacobs mined key texts in colonial archives.

    Her talk focused on Catholics in the British Isles and British Empire between 1710s and 1830s with an emphasis on the latter years. She shared that while an anti-Catholic and pro-Protestant agenda was at the heart of British empire building in the 17th and 18th centuries, religious identity was less significant in defining citizenship than one’s willingness to express loyalty to the monarch and ability to contribute to the expansion of a loyal, peaceable, stable, and productive “Pax Brittanica.”

     

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  • Vassiliki (Betty) Smocovitis

    Departments of Biology and History
    2018 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellow

    Dr. Smocovitis received a Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship for her project titled “Masuo Kodani, Genetics, and the Japanese American Experience.” She used the funds to travel to archival collections in Los Angeles, and the San Francisco Bay area in completion of the final phase of research.

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  • Bryce Henson

    Center for African American Studies
    2018 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellow

    Dr. Henson received a Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship for his project titled “Race, Gender, and Bahian Hip-Hop Cultures.” He used the funds for fieldwork in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil. Examining the “diaspora from below” Henson looks at how Bahian hip-hop cultures are created by people in everyday acts, particularly through music and popular culture.

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  • Esther Romeyn

    Center for European Studies
    2018 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellow

    Romeyn studies the intersection of Holocaust memory and migration politics in the Netherlands. She argues that one way the presence of migrants and their descendants is problematized is through the supposed lack of a “shared” past, in particular WWII and the Holocaust. In the Netherlands, and in Europe in general, the Holocaust has been redeemed as the crucible for moral values upon which European and Dutch identity is based. The anti-migrant discourse deems migrants and in particular Muslim migrants incompatible with these values. Holocaust education therefore has become a “test” for Muslim belonging. 

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2017–2018

  • Robert Kawashima

    Department of Religion and Center for Jewish Studies
    2017 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellow

    During the summer of 2017, with the support of the Rothman Fellowship, Dr. Kawashima began research on his proposed book project, The Pentateuch: An Interpretation, his attempt to read that narrative stretching from Genesis through Deuteronomy as if it was a novel, while also taking into consideration the Documentary Hypothesis, according to which the Pentateuch was written by four principle writers and later combined by an editor.

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  • Vandana Baweja

    School of Architecture
    2017 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellow

    Dr. Baweja received a Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship for her project titled “Tropical Architecture in Australia,” which is part of a broader book project on “Tropical Architecture in Florida.”

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  • Shifra Armon

    Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies
    2017 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellow

    Dr. Armon received a Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship for her book project titled “Staging Curiosity: Skepticism, and Science on the Spanish Stage, 1650-1750.” She traveled to Spain for archival research on late seventeenth-century drama and ways of knowing.

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  • Jorge Valdes Kroff

    Departments of Spanish and Linguistics
    2017 Faculty Summer Fellow

    Dr. Jorge Valdés Kroff, Assistant Professor of Spanish and Linguistics, used his 2017 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to travel to the University of Granada. There he tested a group of Spanish-English bilingual speakers about how they use linguistic cues present in prior speech to anticipate upcoming code-switches into English in conversation.

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2016–2017

  • Jodi Schorb

    Department of English
    2016 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Dr. Jodi Schorb, Associate Professor in the Department of English, used her 2016 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to study primary materials in the Human Sexuality Collection at Cornell University and the Wilkinson collection at Yates County History Center, NY. Her current book-length manuscript project, Life Writing and the Eighteenth-Century Erotic Imaginary, explores sex and gender difference in eighteenth-century American life writing and seeks to expand our understanding of conceptions of sex and gender prior to the medicalization of sexuality and the rise of sexology.

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  • Jennifer Rea

    Department of Classics
    2016 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Dr. Jennifer Rea, Associate Professor in the Department of Classics, used her 2016 Rothman Faculty Fellowship to revise and finish the manuscript for her current book project, a graphic history entitled Perpetua’s Journey: Faith, Gender, and Power in the Roman Empire. Perpetua’s Journey combines sequential art and historical commentary to tell the story of Vibia Perpetua, a Christian woman and martyr, executed in Carthage during the birthday celebrations of the Roman emperor Septimius Severus’s son in 203 CE. Unlike previous scholarship that sometimes portrayed Perpetua as a willful and impulsive young woman who rebelled against the Roman authorities, Perpetua’s Journey presents Perpetua as a thoughtful, well-educated leader of her fellow prisoners and as their legal (and spiritual) intercessor – a role normally reserved for men in Roman society.

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  • Evan Hart

    Center for African American Studies
    2016 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Dr. Evan Hart, Visiting Assistant Professor in African American Studies, used her 2016 Rothman Faculty Fellowship to travel to Smith College to do archival research for her current book project, “Building an Inclusive Movement: the National Black Women’s Health Project and the Battle for Health, 1981-1994.” Founded in 1984 by Byllye Avery, The National Black Women’s Health Project was the first organization devoted solely to the health concerns of women of color in the United States. Their independence from the National Women’s Health Network raised red flags among mainstream feminists who argued that all women shared the same health care needs regardless of race. Dr. Hart argues that the subsequent debate amongst feminists about makes a social movement “inclusive” created new organizational strategies modeled by the National Black Women’s Health Project but also exposed fractures in the feminist movement.

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  • Michelle Campos

    History
    2016 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Dr. Michelle Campos (Department of History), an Associate Professor studying the modern Middle East, used her 2016 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to travel to Jerusalem and conduct research relating to her current book project, Unmixing the Holy City, and an accompanying multi-media GIS project, “Jerusalem 1905.” Taken together, these projects will constitute a book project that is supplemented by a digital interface highlighting the social history of Jerusalem and the lived experience of Jerusalemites around the turn of the twentieth century. While the book project takes a look at the fifty year transformation from mixed imperial city to colonial and national capital, the digital project aims to provide a microhistorical view of the city in a single year and to engage the public in a discussion about different claims over Jerusalem.

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  • Hélène Blondeau

    Literatures, Languages, and Cultures
    2016 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Dr. Hélène Blondeau, Associate Professor of Languages, Literatures and Culture, used her 2016 Rothman Faculty Fellowship to travel to the United Kingdom, Belgium, and Canada. She used the trips to access research materials at the University of Montreal, and to consult other specialists in Brussels and Birmingham focusing on language variation and language identity in Montreal and Brussels. This will provide the foundation for her current project which compares the role of French in the two cities and the impact that historical developments, contemporary migrations, and multicultural contact have had on the two local varieties of French.

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2015–2016

  • Velvet Yates

    Department of Classics
    2015 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Velvet Yates, a faculty member in the Classics Department, used her 2015 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to complete research for a forthcoming article in an edited volume titled “Men’s Cosmetics in Plato and Xenophon.” This article delves into how fourth century BCE Athenian philosophers redefined gender and physical appearance to distinguish between the aristocratic class and craftsmen, and exclude the latter from legitimate political participation.

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  • Ying Xiao

    Department of Languages, Literatures & Cultures
    2015 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Ying Xiao, Assistant Professor in Literatures, Languages, and Cultures, used her 2015 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to travel to China and finish research for her book project, China in the Mix: Cinema, Popular Music, and Multilingualism in the Age of Globalization, 1984-2010. Film, film sound, and popular music present a complex picture of contemporary Chinese culture – a culture shaped by global economic trends, China’s embrace of capitalism, and new cultural contacts. Films offer complex images and stories that tap into cultural tropes and highlight moments of cultural change. Film soundtracks, although subtle, create crucial connections between sounds and images. Their analysis is important for understanding the effects of media in a global world. Post-socialist China is no different. Focusing on the films of Zhang Yimou, an influential and popular Chinese director, Xiao argues that the connection between sound and image in his films tell a larger a story about Chinese culture in the global age.

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  • Stephanie A. Smith

    Department of English
    2015 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Stephanie A. Smith, a full Professor in the English Department, used her 2015-2016 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to research and begin drafting a novel titled STILL ICE. The novel tells the story of Cody Hoving, CEO of a soft robotics company, who inherits property on Martha’s Vineyard after the death of his estranged grandfather. The title of the novel refers to how waves freeze still off the coast of Martha’s Vineyard during very cold winters, and visually captures many themes of the novel including immobility, anxiety, fragility, mortality, and the significance of place.

    The first chapter of the novel is now available.

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  • Ann Whitney Sanford

    Department of Religion
    2015 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Ann Whitney Sanford, an Associate Professor in the Department of Religion, used her 2015 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to conduct ethnographic fieldwork with intentional communities to complete a book project titled Be the Change: Food, Community and Sustainability in America. Intentional communities translate the values of non-violence, voluntary simplicity, and equity into alternative and sustainable forms of social and economic organization. Whether it is the ecovillage or an urban co-op, each intentional community embraces ecological responsibility. But these are not stereotypical “hippie” communes. Rather, intentional communities often use innovative engineering and other types of expertise to translate values into action.

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  • Richard Kernaghan

    Department of Anthropology
    2015 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Richard Kernaghan, an Assistant Professor in Anthropology, used his 2015 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to conduct ethnographic fieldwork in Peru’s Upper Huallaga Valley for his second book project, provisionally titled, Semblance in Terrain: On the Legal Topographies of Postwar. In his current research Kernaghan focuses on shifting patterns of rural mobility, transportation technology, and land tenure as a critical lens for assessing how landscapes are materially refigured and affectively transformed in the wake of extended periods of political violence. In this tropical region of central Peru—where the Maoist Shining Path insurgency at one time asserted territorial control over vast stretches of the countryside—Kernaghan draws on oral histories, photographs, video, and storytelling as well as the writing of ethnographic encounters in order to document the day-to-day lives of farmers and rural transportation workers (transportistas). In so doing he examines the broad economy of images through which this postwar terrain acquires temporal density today: in ways that haunt, but sometimes simply disregard the past.

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  • Donna Cohen

    School of Architecture
    2015 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Donna Cohen, Associate Professor of Architecture, used her 2015 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to begin work on curating, designing, and fabricating an exhibit on the architectural work of Donald Judd.

    Donald Judd, one of the most important artists of the 20th century, made architecture; this exhibit is the first to focus on built and unrealized projects, previously published and unpublished, and to communicate the vast breadth and range in size and scope of his proposals to a wide audience. Not only does the exhibit make visible Judd’s interest and ability in designing environments at every scale, it also prompts and informs timely discussions on the future of those works of architecture.

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2014–2015

  • Peter Westmoreland

    Department of Philosophy
    2014 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Dr. Peter Westmoreland used his 2014 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to support the writing of a long journal article entitled, “Giving Philosophy a Hand: Left and Right in Swordplay, Brains, and Lived Experience,” which will be submitted for publication in 2015. Westmoreland’s research questions the normative belief that left-and right-handed people are mirror-images of one another. Current scientific research into handedness has been shaped by the assumption of symmetry. Instead of focusing on how handedness is experienced everyday by left and right handers, neuro-science has looked for the difference in the brain. Philosophers, despite interest in the body as a center of experience, have not pursued any kind of robust analysis of the experience of handedness. In order to correct these omissions, Westmoreland argues that left-and right-handers embody their handedness differently because their experiences of the world are different – they develop different kinds of skills, styles, and preferences.

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  • Ana de Prada Pérez

    Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies
    2014 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Dr. Ana de Prada Pérez, a faculty member in the University of Florida’s Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies, used her 2014 Rothman Summer Faculty Fellowship to conduct research on bilingualism in Minorca, Spain. In particular, de Prada Pérez focused on the phenomenon of code-switching, or the ability of bilingual speakers to alternate between two languages in spoken discourse. Some of her previous research examined code-switching between English and Spanish; this project studied a different linguistic pair – Catalan and Spanish. By comparing and contrasting these two linguistic pairs through the common denominator of Spanish, she found that differences appear that suggest that formal rules of language use influence when and how code-switching occurs. Code-switching is not the devolution of language, but rather embodies linguistic flexibility and creativity.

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  • Maya Stanfield-Mazzi

    School of Art + Art History
    2014 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Dr. Maya Stanfield-Mazzi used her 2014 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to begin writing a second book manuscript addressing how Amerindian artisans visually articulated Catholicism through church textiles and embroidery after the Spanish conquest. The Spanish colonial period (ca. 1520-1820) is commonly viewed as characterized by the imposition of foreign religious culture on indigenous peoples. However, as Stanfield-Mazzi argues, the evidence of textiles and embroidery weave a different story. Rather than coercion emanating from the colonial center, Stanfield-Mazzi argues that there was a cultural mechanism of push and pull. Indigenous artisans utilized traditional materials and techniques to produce Church textiles and tapestries with Catholic iconography. This affected local churches as much as it affected the colonized peoples.

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  • Kevin Marshall

    School of Theatre and Dance
    2014 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Kevin Marshall, a faculty member of the University of Florida School of Theatre and Dance and Director of the Center for Art & Public Policy, used his 2014 Rothman Summer Faculty Fellowship to write the play Gator Tales. Gator Tales delves into the history of racial integration at the University of Florida (UF) by bringing oral histories of UF’s first black alumni to life on stage.

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  • Ben Hebblethwaite

    Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures
    2014 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Dr. Ben Hebblethwaite used his 2014 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to travel to Paris, France to study the influence of Islam on French language and culture as part of a long-term book project. In particular, Dr. Hebblethwaite explored the linguistic contact between vernacular French and Arabic through rap music created by French Muslims. Dr. Hebblethwaite’s research suggests that common religious idioms and vocabulary unique to Arabic overlap into vernacular French through rap music, which forms a common set of cultural terms shared by both languages and their speakers. Although this common set of shared terms, or lexical borrowings, is hardly universal, it nevertheless indicates a broader cultural awareness of the religious lexical field of Islam.

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  • Margaret Butler

    School of Music
    2014 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Dr. Margaret Butler used her 2014 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to support work on a second book manuscript, “Opera in the Age of Reform: Traetta, Parma, and the Rhetoric of Innovation.” The setting for her research is the eighteenth century, when the northern Italian city of Parma came under the control of the Bourbon royal house after it was ceded by the Hapsburgs in the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle in 1748. During this period, the traditional Italian genre of opera seria was criticized for its lack of dramatic unity due to the dominance of powerful solo singers and unruly audiences.

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  • Alexander Burak

    Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures
    2014 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Dr. Alexander Burak, an assistant professor of Russian Studies in the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures at the University of Florida, used his Rothman Summer Faculty Fellowship to begin organizing, translating, and editing an anthology of previously untranslated works of cutting-edge Russian cultural and social thinkers. Although Russia’s political ideologies are often portrayed as dominated by the authoritarian regime of Putin, there have been, nonetheless, critical ideological and social debates about Russian identity stimulated by figures as diverse as Aleksandr G. Dugin, Vladimir Pozner, and the rock band Pussy Riot. These debates are seldom, if ever, reflected in American media discussions of Russia, in no small part because they frequently take the form of audio-or audio-visual-only files without accompanying transcripts or translations. And, while the number of Internet materials in Russian debates is exponentially increasing, the number of individuals in the U.S. who are linguistically and culturally proficient enough to understand these materials has shrunk since the days of the Cold War. Thus, it is vitally important to have an English-language version of important texts that reveal the complex nature of Russian identity today.

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2013–2014

  • Robert Wagman

    Classics
    2013 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Prof. Robert Wagman used the Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to work on a book project titled Beliefs of Modern Greece (BMG), an annotated English translation of Leo Allatius’ De Graecorum hodie quorundam opinationibus from 1645. BMG is the first comprehensive treatment of Greek folklore ever published and has never been translated into to English. Furthermore, BMG is not easily accessible and is often only quoted (by modern scholars) in parts or excerpts due to the small number of copies available mostly in Europe. Even an original text, once found, is hard to read because its abbreviations and symbols are difficult to understand without practice and training in early Greek fonts. All of these concerns combine to show the need for an English translation of BMG.

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  • Jennifer Rea

    Classics
    2013 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Prof. Jennifer Rea used her 2013 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to complete her book project Empire Without End: Science Fiction, Fantasy and the Augustan Poets. In this book, she explores classical narratives, such as Vergil’s Aeneid, that permeate our culture. What, she asks, are the costs of empire without end? What will be our limit of sacrifice for personal freedom? And what sacrifices do we ask of those who become heroes to us?

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  • Robert Kawashima

    Religion
    2013 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Professor Robert Kawashima used his 2013 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to continue work on his book manuscript The Archaeology of Ancient Israelite Knowledge. Kawashima’s book examines the intellectual-historical significance of Israelite religion within the context of the ancient Mediterranean world. Dr. Kawashima investigates what is often referred to as the monotheistic revolution and, in particular, ancient Israelite religious thought from the monarchical period (1000-586 B.C.E.). Invoking Foucault’s historical-epistemological project, the “archaeology of knowledge,” Kawashima argues that ancient Israelite religion, breaking with the system of myth, existed as a distinct system of knowledge for several centuries until the dawn of Jewish apocalypticism (perhaps as early as the 5th century B.C.E.). In this way, ancient Israelite thought paved the way for that Jewish apocalyptic sect now known as early Christianity, and thus occupies a significant place in the intellectual history of the West.

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  • Eleni Bozia

    Classics
    2013 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Dr. Eleni Bozia used her 2013 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to travel to Rome, Italy, where she completed the 3D scanning of statues at Palazzo Altemps – Soprintendeza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Roma under the supervision of archaeologist and curator Dr. Alessandra Capodiferro. The completion of this project allowed Dr. Bozia to populate the 3D Virtual Museum of World Heritage, which is part of the UF Digital Epigraphy and Archaeology Project, a joint project with computer engineer Prof. Angelos Barmpoutis (CISE/Digital Worlds), Prof. Robert Wagman (Classics Department), and several other scholars from acclaimed American and European Universities and Institutions. The Digital Epigraphy Toolbox is a novel and technologically-advanced scientific tool for the effective study and comparative analysis of Greek and Latin inscriptions. It provides archaeologists and epigraphists with a cost-effective and efficient method for 3D digitization of inscriptions based on ektypa (paper casts, impressions of inscriptions on a paper) as well as access to an online dynamic library of 3D inscriptions. The Virtual Museum of World Heritage is a virtual interactive 3D museum featuring significant world-heritage exhibits.

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2012–2013

  • Galina Rylkova

    Languages, Literatures and Cultures
    2012 Faculty Summer Fellow

    Prof. Galina Rylkova was awarded a Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to support research for her second book project, “Creative Lives: The Art of Being a Successful Russian Writer.” This project explores how a representative selection of Russian writers from the last 150 years understood concepts of success, fame, and accomplishment. Prof. Rylkova also considers how these concepts shaped these writers’ lives, their creative output, relationships with their readers, and their cultural legacies today. She used the funds to finance travel to archives and significant locations in the United Kingdom, Italy, and the United States.

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  • Conor O’Dwyer

    Center for European Studies and Political Science
    2012 Faculty Summer Fellow

    Prof. Conor O’Dwyer used his 2012 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to fund research on his current project, “Culture Clash: Internationalization, Europeanization, and Gay Rights in Postcommunist Europe.” This project explores the effect of European integration on the politics of gay rights in postcommunist Europe. It builds on fieldwork Prof. O’Dwyer conducted between 2007 and 2011 in Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Romania, and Hungary. Through his fieldwork, Prof. O’Dwyer gathered interviews with activists, observers, participants, and government officials involved in gay rights activism throughout East Central Europe since the fall of communism.

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  • Shifra Armon

    Spanish and Portuguese Studies
    2012 Faculty Summer Fellow

    Prof. Shifra Armon used her 2012 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to complete a chapter of her second book-length manuscript, A Compass for Conduct: Performing Masculinity in Early Modern Spain. Although previous scholarship has asserted that the seventeenth-century decline of the Spanish Empire precipitated a crisis of masculinity, this manuscript challenges that view by separating the narrative of Spain’s fall from its predominance as an imperial power from the emergence of a gender order better suited to this period of rapid change.

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2011–2012

  • Mary Watt

    Italian Language & Literature, Department of Languages, Literatures & Cultures
    2011 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    With the support of a Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship, Professor Mary Watt, a specialist in Italian literature and chair of the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, was able to pursue her interest in exposing a less familiar side of the enigmatic explorer Christopher Columbus. While Columbus is often seen as one of the first modern men, a secular thinker who understood that the world was round and that he could get to the East by sailing west, Prof. Watt has focused upon the messianic and apocalyptic ideas that influenced Columbus. In the summer of 2011, she traveled to Seville to conduct archival research on Columbus and spend her summer working on a book about the famous navigator.

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  • Mark Thurner

    Latin American History, Department of History
    2011 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    With the support of the Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship in Summer 2011, Prof. Mark Thurner conducted museum research in Paris, France; Milan, Turin, and Rome, Italy; and Athens, Greece. His visits contributed toward ongoing research tracing the genealogy of museums and artifacts relating to political and disciplinary discourses. Travel funded in part by the Rothman Summer Fellowship also allowed Prof. Thurner to gather information used in preparation for LAH3931 Museums and Modernity, taught in Spring 2012, and which is ultimately intended for a book-length publication. Prof. Thurner has since continued research at museums in Madrid and Berlin.

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  • Mario Poceski

    Chinese Language & Literature, Department of Languages, Literatures & Culture and Department of Religion
    2011 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    During the summer of 2011, with the support of the Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship, Dr. Mario Poceski, Associate Professor in the Department of Religion, conducted extensive research in Japan for his forthcoming book. Tentatively titled The Records of Mazu Daoyi and the Making of Classical Chan Literature, this monograph explores the development of Chan (Zen) Buddhist literature in China. It examines how particular Chan religious texts were transmitted and reinterpreted throughout the course of medieval China, looking in particular at the various records related to the renowned Chan master Mazu Daoyi (709-788). The book will also provide English translations of records and writings about Mazu that have survived from the eighth through eleventh centuries.

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  • Guolong Lai

    Art and Art History
    2011 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    As a 2011 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellow, Assistant Professor Guolong Lai conducted research in Singapore, Beijing, and Taipei. With the support of the Rothman endowment, Prof. Lai has begun a new project on how the art, architecture, and significant places of early China have been preserved and curated in modern China. His research greatly advances our understanding of how the political climate of a country can influence its perceptions of the past. Prof. Lai began his summer research by investigating how Singapore has used its Asian Civilizations Museum to educate the public about their cultural heritage and overcome ethnic conflicts. In China and Taiwan, Prof. Lai visited further cultural heritage sites and acquired materials to continue his studies.

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  • Ingrid Kleespies

    Russian Language & Literature, Department of Languages, Literatures & Cultures
    2011 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Over the summer of 2011, with the support of the Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship, Prof. Ingrid Kleespies revised and completed her book, A Nation Astray: Nomadism and National Identity in Russian Literature. This book, which will be published with Northern Illinois University Press in Fall 2012, explores the idea of wandering, travel, and mobility in Russian literature and thought, especially in the works of such great Russian authors as Nikolai Karamzin, Alexander Pushkin, Petr Chaadaev, Ivan Goncharov, Alexander Herzen, and Fyodor Dostoevsky.

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2010–2011

  • Richard Wang

    Chinese Language & Literature, Department of Languages, Literatures & Cultures
    2010 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    With the support of a Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship (2010), Dr. Richard Wang spent May through August in China. There he pursued his research into princely patronage of Daoism during the Ming dynasty (1368-1644). His trip to China allowed him to find a number of rare books written in the fourteenth through seventeenth centuries by Chinese princes of the Ming dynasty, as well as pre-modern gazetteers and the manuscript of a princely genealogy. He was also able to visit a mausoleum of a Ming prince in Chengdu, Sichuan province, where he studied the funeral objects and tomb design in order to get a more complete picture of the lives and deaths of these members of the Chinese elite.

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  • Amy Abugo Ongiri

    Department of English
    2010 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    With the support of the Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship, Dr. Amy Abugo Ongiri spent the summer months of 2010 at the Hoover Institute at Stanford University and the Freedom Archives in San Francisco. She used these archives to find significant primary source material on radical movements in the sixties and seventies that have not been included in existing scholarship. Her work focuses on two specific radical groups, the Black Panther Party and the Symbionese Liberation Army, and analyzes their use of images in political activism and how images of these groups have been used in turn by others. She is investigating how graphic images challenge the boundaries of new media and the prevalent notion that the radical ideologies of sixties and seventies represent “dead” ideologies.

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  • Ana Margheritis

    Political Science
    2010 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Ana Margheritis spent the summer of 2010 in Spain and France researching the changing identity of Argentinean and Ecuadorian immigrants to Southern Europe with the support of a Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship. Her research interests focus on the political dimension of transnational migration. Building upon previous work on state-led transnationalism, she is studying the construction and evolution of national identity among South American emigrants. She is endeavoring to understand how the conditions and causes of emigration affect people’s ideas of nation, home, and belonging, as well as the impact of state institutions and policies on such questions.

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  • Dragan Kujundzic

    Jewish Studies and Germanic and Slavic Languages & Literatures
    2010 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    With the support of the Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship, Professor Dragan Kujundzic spent the summer of 2010 preparing and filming a documentary on J. Hillis Miller. Miller, as a leading American literary critic and scholar, was a founder of “deconstruction” philosophy and theory in the U.S. As the son of the first post-WWII President of the University of Florida, Miller also has close ties with this university and has come here several times to give talks.

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  • Todd Hasak-Lowy

    Hebrew Language and Literature
    2010 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    As a 2010 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellow, Professor Todd Hasak-Lowy visited Israel as part of ongoing research on Israeli films dealing with the 1982-2000 conflict in Lebanon. His research focused specifically on the films Beaufort (2007), Waltz with Bashir (2008), and Lebanon (2009). With the support of the Rothman Endowment, Hasak-Lowy gathered secondary material on Israeli cinema and these films in particular. He was also able to meet with Israeli writers, filmmakers, and scholars. This research contributed to Hasak-Lowy’s developing thesis that these Israeli war films assert and construct the identity of their protagonist soldiers through an emphasis on vision and sight. Hasak-Lowy argues that this emphasis positions these soldiers as passive witnesses or victims of their circumstances, despite belonging to an invading and later occupying army. He notes that film, as visual media, allows this emphasis on vision and sight to resonate simultaneously in both form and content.

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  • Youssef Haddad

    Arabic Linguistics, Department of Languages, Literatures & Cultures
    2010 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

    Over the summer of 2010, Dr. Youssef Haddad revised and completed a book on comparative syntax with the support of the Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship. Dr. Haddad is interested in the syntax structure of various languages, and has been working on the sentence structure of South Asian languages, such as Assamese, a language of north eastern India. His goal is to gain broader insight into Adjunct Control, the principle of how two subjects, in different parts of the same sentence, the matrix clause and the subordinate clause, reference one another.

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