Award Recipients

The UF Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere recognizes the accomplishments of its fellowship and grant recipients, as well as the achievements of UF faculty and students who have received external awards.

Current Programs in the Public Humanities Grant Recipients
Current Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship Recipients
Current Doctoral Fellowship Recipients
Current Library Enhancement Program Recipients
Current Publication Subvention Grant Recipients
Recent Recipients of External Awards

Programs in the Public Humanities Grants

In 2013, the UF Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere (CHPS) launched its new grants for Programs in the Public Humanities. The Public Humanities grant opportunity, supported by the CHPS Rothman Endowment, encourages and enhances collaboration between the University of Florida and individuals, groups, and organizations in the community by offering grants up to $3,000 to support public programs rooted in one or more of the humanities disciplines. By drawing on expertise from UF and community partners as co-applicants, these public humanities projects create new and exciting opportunities for collaboration between the university and multiple community organizations. Furthermore, these projects encourage community building, cultural understanding, and personal reflection on the values and experiences that connect us together as neighbors, colleagues, and community members to create a civil and morally responsible society. Through projects like these, the Center for Humanities and the Public Sphere seeks to promote broad civic engagement with the communities in which we live and teach.

2017-2018

Gainesville Underground Theatre Festival

Matthew Bratko (Acting), Natasha Home (GUTFest), Tyler Francischine (Health), and Dominic Henry (GUTFest)

The Gainesville Under Ground Theatre Festival is an exploration of identity, history, philosophy, and language via a plethora of live mediums such as dance, theatre, music, installations, film screenings, literary readings, panel discussions and workshops. The festival aims to spark dialogues about what it means to exist in this city, culture, society and time by bringing performers and audiences together into artistic hubs of expression.

Graphic Sequential Art in Motion & Stirring Public Dialogues: Orchestrating Encounters between Two Global Comic Artists and their Cities, Gainesville & Kinshasa

Prof. Nancy Hunt (Department of History) and Tom Hart (Sequential Artists Workshop)

A Public Humanities Grant will fund an intercultural encounter between internationally recognized Congolese comic artist Papa Mfumu’eto and Tom Hart, an award-winning comic artist and founder of Gainesville’s Sequential Artists Workshop. Papa Mfumu’eto and Tom Hart will lead sequential arts workshops with students at Eastside High School, culminating in a comics art show installation at the Sequential Arts Workshop held in tandem with the 17th Carter Conference of the Center for African Studies.

Tracing the Tide: Seahorse Key Marine Laboratory Oral History Project

Val Leitner (Oral History Consultant) and UF Collaborator

In partnership with the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, oral histories and archival documents associated the Seahorse Key Marine Lab will be conducted and preserved. The project seeks to integrate the history of Seahorse Key into the local history of Cedar Key. The public will be able to view materials at several open house events and through the project’s social media presence.

Please visit our Previous Public Humanities Grants Recipients

Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship Recipients

(Photo Credit: Timothy Sofranko)

In 2010, the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, with the support of the Robert and Margaret Rothman Endowment for the Humanities, began a program to award summer fellowships to faculty in the humanities disciplines. The objective of these fellowships is to allow recipients to make significant progress on existing creative/research projects during the summer months. The most recent recipients are below:

2018-2019

Dr. Margaret Butler, School of Music

Dr. Butler received a Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship for her  project titled “The Operatic Prima Donna and Celebrity Culture.” She will travel to the Newberry Library in  Chicago, IL for archival research to consult the Howard Mayer Brown Collection of opera librettos, the rich holdings of manuscript musical scores on microfilm, and contemporary conduct manuals for women.

Dr. Roberto Chauca, Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies

Dr. Chauca received a Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship for his  project titled “Missionary Polemics and the Making of Early Modern Tropical Knowledge.” He will use the funds to conduct archival research at  the General Archive of the Franciscan Order and the Archive of the Jesuit General Curia in Rome, Italy.

Dr. Jessica Harland-Jacobs, Department of History

Dr. Harland-Jacobs received a Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship for her  project titled “The Catholic Question and the British Empire, 1710s-1830s.” She will use the funds to write the last chapter of the manuscript, and  put the entire first draft of the book through a final revision before submitting.

Dr. Bryce Henson, Center for African American Studies

Dr. Henson received a Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship for his  project titledd “Race, Gender, and Bahian Hip-Hop Cultures.” He will use the funds for fieldwork in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil.

Dr. Esther Romeyn, Center for European Studies

Dr. Romeyn received a Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship for her  project titledd “Holocaust Memory and Migration Politics in the Netherlands.” She will use the funds to conduct archival and ethnographic research on the efforts of two major Dutch Holocaust memorial institutions, the Anne Frank Foundation and the Foundation ’40-’45.

Dr. Vassiliki (Betty) Smocovitis, Departments of Biology and History

Dr. Smocovitis received a Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship for her  project titled “Masuo Kodani, Genetics, and the Japanese American Experience.” She will use the funds to  travel to archival collections in Los Angeles, and the San Francisco Bay area in completion of the final phase of research.

Please also visit our Previous Faculty Fellows.

2017-2018

Prof. Shifra Armon, Department of Spanish & Portuguese Studies

Dr. Armon received a Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship for her book project titled “Staging Curiosity: Skepticism, and Science on the Spanish Stage, 1650-1750.” She will travel to Spain for archival research on late seventeenth-century drama and ways of knowing.

Prof. Vandana Baweja, School of Architecture

Dr. Baweja received a Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship for her project titled “Tropical Architecture in Australia,” which is part of a broader book project on “Tropical Architecture in Florida.” She will travel to Australia to conduct research on Australian architecture, globalization, and climate.
Read more on Vandana Baweja

Prof. Robert Kawashima, Department of Religion and the Center for Jewish Studies

Dr. Kawashima received a Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship for his book project titled “The Pentateuch: An Interpretation.” He will travel to Berkeley, California, for archival research at the Graduate Theological Union to study Pentateuch and the Documentary Hypothesis.

Prof. Jorge Valdés Kroff, Department of Spanish & Portuguese Studies

Dr. Valdés Kroff received a Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship for his project titled “Anticipating the Switch: How Bilinguals Integrate Code-Switching in Comprehension.” He will use his funding to travel to the University of Granada in Spain and test Spanish monolingual and Spanish-English bilingual speakers to learn how bilingual speakers comprehend and integrate code-switching.
Read more on Jorge Valdés Kroff

Please also visit our Previous Faculty Fellows.

Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship and Rothman Doctoral Fellowship Recipients

(Photo Credit: Timothy Sofranko)

In 2012, the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, with the support of the Tedder Family Endowed Research Award in the Humanities, began a program to award summer fellowships to doctoral candidates working on humanities topics who have passed their qualifying exams by the application deadline. This fellowship may be used to cover research expenses, including travel, related to their dissertation project. Work on projects with interdisciplinary appeal is particularly encouraged. Additional awards may be granted with funds from the Rothman endowment. The most recent recipients are below:

2018-2019

Elizabeth Currin, Department of Education

Elizabeth Currin received a Rothman Doctoral Fellowship for her dissertation project titled “Storied Stance: An Oral History of Long-Term Teacher Researchers in the Age of Accountability.” She will use her funds to purchase coding software for the purpose of data analysis.

Luc Houle , Department of History

Luc Houle received a Tedder Doctoral Fellowship for his dissertation project titled “On the Margins of Medieval Power: Ramon Berenguer V and Mobility.” He will use his funds to conduct an exhaustive survey of charters and notarial documents relevant to his research. 

Tameka Samuels-Jones, Department of Sociology and Crimonology & Law

Tameka Samuels-Jones received a Rothman Doctoral Fellowship for her dissertation project titled “Regulatory Law and Local Stakeholder influences on Green Crime in the Blue Mountains, Jamaica.” She will use her funds to conduct further research in The Blue and John Crow Mountains of Jamaica. 

Jodi Shaw, Department of Religion

Jodi Shaw received a Tedder Doctoral Fellowship for her dissertation project titled “The Goddess and Dancing Śiva in the Multiple Ritual Worlds of Chidambaram.” She will use her funds to conduct further fieldwork in Chidambaram, Tamil Nadu, India as well as to visit the archives in near by Pondicherry. 

Matthew Strickland, Department of History

Matthew Strickland received a Rothman Doctoral Fellowship for his dissertation project titled “Civilizing Slaves: Imperialism, Anglicanism, and African Slavery on Codrington Plantation.” He will use his funds to fund research in Barbados  in the relevant archival locations as well as traveling to the Codrington College archaeological site. 

Alexandria Wilson, Department of Political Science

Alexandria Wilson received a Rothman Doctoral Fellowship for her dissertation project titled “Framing Exploitation: The Women’s Movement and Anti-trafficking Policy in East Central Europe.” She will use her funds to conduct fieldwork in the Czech Republic, Poland, and Slovakia.

Please also visit our Previous Doctoral Fellows.

2017-2018

Alexis Baldacci, Department of History

Alexis Baldacci received a Rothman Doctoral Fellowship for her dissertation project titled “Daily Heroics: Women, Material Culture, and Everyday Life in Revolutionary Cuba, 1959-1989.” She will use her funds to finish writing two chapters on consumerism in Cuba in the 1970s and 1980s.
Read more on Alexis Baldacci

Navid Bargrizan, School of Music

Navid Bargrizan received a Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship for his dissertation project titled “Microtonality, Technology, and Dramatic Narrative in the Theatrical Music of Harry Partch and Manfred Stahnke.” He will travel to Germany for archival research and conduct interviews relating to the philosophical, technological, musical and dramatic facets of Stahnke’s operas.

Derek N. Boetcher, Department of History

Derek Boetcher received a Rothman Doctoral Fellowship for his dissertation project titled “Webs of Identity and Memory: Commemorative Artwork in Britain, Ireland, and the Dominions, 1700-2015.” He will travel to New Zealand to visit commemorative sites and conduct archival research to assess the connection between monuments and conceptions of empire.
Read more on Derek Boetcher

Adrienne deNoyelles, Department of History

Adrielle deNoyelles received a Rothman Doctoral Fellowship for her project dissertation titled “The ‘Lung Block’: Tuberculosis and Progressive Reform in Early-Twentieth-Century New York.” She will travel to New York City to complete archival research on a coalition of early twentieth-century social and public activists who campaigned to demolish a New York tenement neighborhood with particularly high tuberculosis mortality.

Cacey Farnsworth, Department of History

Cacey Farnsworth received a Rothman Doctoral Fellowship for his dissertation project titled “Atlantic Lisbon: From Restoration to Baroque Splendor, 1640-1755.” He will travel to Lisbon for archival research on Lisbon’s transformation as it became an imperial capital.

Elyssa Gage, Department of History

Elyssa Gage received a Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship for her dissertation project titled “‘A Softer and More Durable Glory’: Justice and Colonialism in Post-Revolutionary France, 1802-1830.” She will travel to the Archives nationales d’Outre-Mer in Aix-en-Provence, France, for archival research of key moments in the restoration of slavery and the monarchy through the lens of two administrators.

Prea Persaud, Department of Religion

Prea Persaud received a Rothman Doctoral Fellowship for her dissertation project titled “Vocalizing Authenticity: The Role of Pundits, Temples, and Indian Organizations in the Creation of Caribbean Hinduism.” She will use the funds for a trip to Trinidad, where she will study religious rituals and conduct interviews and archival research on the relationship between Indian and Caribbean identities.
Read more on Prea Persaud

Matthew F. Simmons, Department of History

Matthew Simmons received a Rothman Doctoral Fellowship for his project titled “Revolt in the Fields: The Southern Tenant Farmers’ Union and the New Deal.” He will travel to Mississippi State University and the Arkansas State Archives to research the lives of the most underprivileged inhabitants of the American South and the dynamics of social inequality during the Great Depression.

Please also visit our Previous Doctoral Fellows.

Library Enhancement Program in the Humanities

Beginning in 2009, the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere has used funds from the Rothman Endowment to sponsor a grant competition among University of Florida faculty to expand the existing University of Florida library collections in areas in and related to the humanities that are currently underserved. Resources may include print, digital, or audio-visual media that enhance scholarly research and teaching in the humanities as well as affiliated disciplines. Requests that address the needs of broader constituencies of the University beyond the immediate applicants are judged especially favorably. The most recent recipients are below:

2017-2018

Najwa Al-Tabaa and Charles Acheson, Department of English

Najwa Al-Tabaa and Charles Acheson on behalf of the Graduate Comics Organization and ImageTexT: Interdisciplinary Comics Study Journal, received a Library Enhancement Grant to acquire materials necessary to enhance these programs focusing on Comics and Visual Rhetoric. The grant will add to the UF Smathers Libraries’ comics collection with more theoretical texts on comics and adaptation that will benefit students and faculty working in the field of Comics and Visual Rhetoric, Popular Culture Studies, Digital Humanities, Film and Media Studies, and Fine Art.
Read more on Najwa Al-Tabaa and Charles Acheson

Please also visit our Previous Library Enhancement Program Recipients.

Publication Subvention

The following faculty members and graduate students are among those who have received prestigious recognition and support for their research and publications. A selection of recent awards and accomplishments are listed below:

2017-2018

Please also visit our Previous Publication Subvention Grant Recipients.

Recipients of External Awards

The following faculty members and graduate students are among those who have received prestigious recognition and support for their research and publications. A selection of recent awards and accomplishments are listed below:

2018-2019

Benjamin Soares

Henry Luce Foundation’s Initiative on Religion in International Affairs
“Islam in Africa in Global Context”

Ken Chitwood

Spalding Trust
“Puerto Rican Muslims and the Idea(l) of Muslim Cosmopolitanism”

Richard Kernaghan

National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipend
“Lands, Territory, and Law in Post-war Peru”

Laurie N. Taylor, George A. Smathers Libraries & Paul Ortiz, SPOHP, Hélène Huet, UF Libraries, & Leah Rosenberg, English

National Endowment for the Humanities Grant Award
“Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Advanced Institute”

2017-2018

Shifra Armon, Spanish & Portuguese Studies

Fall 2017 Canada Fulbright Research Chair of Society and Culture, University of Alberta
“Staging Curiosity: Skepticism, and Science on the Spanish Stage 1650-1750″

Derek N. Boetcher, History

2018 Phi Kappa Phi Dissertation Fellowship
“Webs of Identity and Memory: Commemorative Artwork in Britain, Ireland, and the Dominions, 1700-2015”

Margaret Butler, School of Music

2017 Delmas Foundation Grant for Independent Research in Venice
“The Prima Donna and Celebrity Culture, 1750–1790”

Ross Cotton, Political Science

Summer 2017 Association Internationale des Études Québécoises and the American Council for Québec Studies Québec/US University Grant
“Contesting Sovereignty: Explaining the Paradox of Nationalist Party Success in Scotland and Quebec”

Charlie Hailey, School of Architecture

2018 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow
Field of Study: Architecture, Planning and Design

Ben Hebblethwaite, Languages, Literatures & Cultures

2017-2018 Southeastern Conference Faculty Travel Grant
“The Atlantic English Creole Project”

Justin Hosbey, Anthropology

2017-2018 Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities and African American History and Culture at the University of Maryland

Yeonhaun Kang, English

Spring 2018 Visiting Scholar Fellowship at the Texas Tech University Humanities Center
2017-2018 National Research Foundation of Korea Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities

Richard Kernaghan, Anthropology

2017-2018 American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship
“Semblance in Terrain: On the Legal Topographies of Postwar, in Peru’s Upper Huallaga Valley”

Fiona McLaughlin, Languages, Literatures & Cultures

2017-2018 Camargo Foundation Residential Fellowship
“Language and Urban Life in Dakar: A Critical Sociolinguistics of Language in the Postcolony”

Jessie-Leigh Seago, Political Science

2017-2018 US Fulbright Research Grant
“Understanding White Political Mobilization in Namibia”

Stephanie A. Smith, English

2017-2018 Creative Writer’s Residency at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts

Jeffrey Vadala, Anthropology

2017-18 Postdoctoral Fellow in Blended Learning and Digital Humanities
“Five College Digital Humanities Program”

Please also visit our Previous External Award Recipients.