Faculty who are interested in submitting a Quest course proposal are invited to attend one of the January workshops on Quest course design. Participants will learn what are the goals of the UF Quest program; how Quest courses differ from other general education courses; and how to prepare an application to teach a Quest course for Spring 2021. Particular attention will be given to the syllabus review process and how to compose course objectives and student learning outcomes that meet Quest and general education requirements.

Faculty who are interested in submitting a Quest course proposal are invited to attend one of the January workshops on Quest course design. Participants will learn what are the goals of the UF Quest program; how Quest courses differ from other general education courses; and how to prepare an application to teach a Quest course for Spring 2021. Particular attention will be given to the syllabus review process and how to compose course objectives and student learning outcomes that meet Quest and general education requirements.

Faculty who are interested in submitting a Quest course proposal are invited to attend one of the January workshops on Quest course design. Participants will learn what are the goals of the UF Quest program; how Quest courses differ from other general education courses; and how to prepare an application to teach a Quest course for Spring 2021. Particular attention will be given to the syllabus review process and how to compose course objectives and student learning outcomes that meet Quest and general education requirements.

The UF Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies invites you to a discussion on what social justice is and is not, how it can be done in classes, and why it’s important to be critical of teaching for social justice.

Dr. Terry Osborn is a professor of educational leadership at the University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee.  He is the award-winning author of Teaching World Languages for Social Justice: A sourcebook of Principles and Practices (2006). He led in the formation of USFSM’s Center for Partnerships for Arts-Integrated Teaching (PAInT).

Florida’s contributions to the war effort during World War II were both extensive and varied. Floridians had to contend with coastal blackouts, German submarines lurking offshore, sabotage attempts, strict rationing and the challenges of accommodating thousands of troops who came to take advantage of the state’s ideal climate for military training. Join State Archives education officer Katrina Harkness and historian Dr. Josh Goodman for an exploration of primary sources and other tools you can use to add some local Florida flair to your World War II unit this year. The resources selected correspond to the state standards and include ADA-compliant transcripts.

Click here to register for this free webinar.

Sponsored by the Florida Council for History Education.

Led by Sophia Acord, Delia Steverson, and Steve Noll

Have you ever thought about teaching a course with a colleague from a different discipline? Through team-teaching, faculty can create innovative new courses for students that tie together different ways of looking at a topic and demonstrate the value of interdisciplinary inquiry. Instructors also benefit from collaborating by exploring their interests, learning new tools and areas of work, and seeing the broader impacts of their disciplines in other fields. But translating collegial conversations into a cohesive course, particularly with a partner from a very different discipline, requires some creativity. This workshop draws on the experience of over 15 UF team-taught courses made possible through the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere’s Interdisciplinary Team-Teaching Grant to show you how two heads can be better than one.

This nuts and bolts workshop is organized with the UF Center for Teaching Excellence and follows from the Team Teaching from Classroom to Gallery workshop. Team Teaching 101 will walk you through the steps of preparing a team-taught course. Start planning your syllabus and the division of labor in your classroom. And develop a flyer to recruit students into your exciting collaboration!

This workshop is part of the Passport to Great Teaching certificate track.  For more information and to register to attend, visit: http://teach.ufl.edu/

The UF Synergies series features informal talks by the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere’s Rothman Faculty Summer Fellows, Tedder Doctoral Fellows, and Rothman Doctoral Fellows. Fellows will speak for 20 minutes in length about their funded work, leaving ample time for questions and discussion. Talks are paired across disciplinary boundaries to stimulate discussions about threads and connections across research areas and allow for synergies of ideas to emerge in interdisciplinary conversations.

Dr. Trysh Travis (CGSWSR) “A Gray Account of a Black and White Issue”

Dr. Trysh Travis will present on the research she conducted while she was in residency at the National Humanities Center in the summer of 2019, which resulted in an article with the working title “‘Lee Was a Gentleman’: Understanding White Women’s Polite Racism in the Confederate Monument Controversy.”  She will discuss her decision to write about a statue of Robert E. Lee that was recently removed from a city park in Dallas, a few blocks from the house where her grandmother grew up. She will draw out the connections and contradictions among her political, intellectual, and “artistic” motivations for this project, and the choices she made among possible approaches, archives, and publication outlets. Along the way she will attend to the ways that the environment at the NHC helped her to think about the material.

Luc Houle (History) “Teaching with Archives, Objects, and Maps: Lessons from the National Humanities Center”

All learning begins with curiosity.  In this talk, Luc Houle will introduce lessons learned at the National Humanities Center’s Graduate Student Summer Residency 2019 in order to argue that primary sources should be made more accessible to students and foregrounded more often in the classroom.  Primary sources, such as archives, objects, and maps, spark curiosity among students, leading them to ask questions for themselves.  The instructor can then empower students to help them answer their own inquiries, both individually and in group settings.

New to teaching? Struggling to balance your teaching and research obligations? Then attend this session for some easy-to-implement tips on how to maximize your teaching effectiveness while minimizing teaching-related headaches.

Sean Trainor (PhD), Lecturer, Management Communication Center, will lead this brief workshop as part of the Smathers Libraries ‘Building You Career’ series.

No registration required. Open to all UF Graduate and Professional Students.

Ph.D. Candidate, Education
2018-2019 Rothman Doctoral Fellow

Currin’s research addresses the “Age of Accountability,” a decades-long period defined by top-down education reforms that position teachers as both the problem and the potential solution for America’s so-called failing public schools. This, Currin argues, leads to increased teacher stress, a loss of creativity, and a shift in teachers’ answering to superiors rather than their own students. Read More “Elizabeth Currin, Department of Education”