You are invited to attend the conference Culture and Conflict in Palestine/Israel held February 1-3 at UF.

As diplomatic and military efforts to establish justice and peace in Palestine/Israel have reached a stalemate, we call for a closer look into the cultural sphere – not as a form of escapism but rather as a sphere that might generate potential transformative energies and affect other spheres. The conference brings together scholars of Israel/Palestine from diverse disciplines (including anthropology, architecture, history, literature, sociology, and political science) who share the view that the cultural sphere is a contested terrain, where actions and discourses promote various political goals. They will discuss how architecture, cartoons, cinema, collective calendars, cuisine, dress codes, nightclubs, poetry, popular music, and video art shape and are shaped by political processes.

For the full schedule and list of venues, click here.

The conference is sponsored by the Alexander Grass Chair in Jewish Studies; Center for Global Islamic Studies; UF International Center; Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica; Center for Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies Research; Department of Sociology, Criminology, and Law.

You are invited to attend the conference Culture and Conflict in Palestine/Israel held February 1-3 at UF.  The kickoff event for this conference will be a free screening of this documentary from 2017.

When a nation-wide uprising breaks out in 1987, a woman in Gaza must make a choice between love, family, and freedom. Undaunted, she embraces all three, joining a clandestine network of women in a movement that forces the world to recognize the Palestinian right to self-determination for the first time. Naila and the Uprising chronicles the remarkable journey of Naila Ayesh whose story weaves through the most vibrant, nonviolent mobilization in Palestinian history — the First Intifada in the late 1980s.

The movie will be followed by a discussion about cinema as a political tool with the impact producer, Emma Alpert.

The conference is sponsored by the Alexander Grass Chair in Jewish Studies; Center for Global Islamic Studies; UF International Center; Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica; Center for Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies Research; Department of Sociology, Criminology, and Law.

This presentation offers a comparative-historical perspective on the militarization of policing in through a close examination of urban policing in early 20th century America, a period that historians call “the Reform Era” of policing. Based upon a nested cross-city analysis of qualitative and quantitative data, the study shows that police “reforms” in this period constituted an early form of militarization resulting from colonial feedback. Local police borrowed tactics, techniques, and organizational templates from America’s imperial-military regime that had been developed to conquer and rule foreign populations. The study also explains how and why this occurred, connecting local policing to the dynamics of American empire abroad and race relations at home.

About Julian Go:

Julian Go’s teaching and research areas include comparative-historical sociology; empires, colonialism and post colonialism; social theory; global sociology; and politics & culture. His scholarship explores the sociology of empires, colonial encounters, postcolonial global formations, and postcolonial thought. Much of his early work has focused upon the United States empire. This research has resulted in various articles and various book projects, which include: The American Colonial State in the Philippines: Global Perspectives (co-edited with Anne Foster, Duke University Press, 2003),  American Empire and the Politics of Meaning(Duke University Press, 2008) (co-winner of the Mary Douglas Prize for Best Book from the Sociology of Culture Section of the American Sociological Association and Finalist for the Philippines National Book Award), and Patterns of Empire: the British and American Empires, 1688 to Present (Cambridge University Press, 2011), which won the prize for Best Book in Global &  Transnational Sociology from the American Sociological Association, the American Political Science Association’s J. David Greenstone Book Award for the Best Book in Politics and History in 2010 and 2011, the 2013 Francesco Guicciardini Prize for Best Book in Historical International Relations from the International Studies Association, and was one of Choice’s “Outstanding Academic Titles” in 2012.

The militarization of the police is not new. It reaches back to the very founding of modern policing. This presentation explores some of this history, from the nineteenth century through the twentieth century, in both the US and the UK, and shows their intimate connections to empire. It argues that police militarization has involved the appropriation of forms, operations and tactics not just from the “military” but more precisely from “imperial-military” regimes. It further shows that this occurs as domestic social fields appear racially homologous with colonial fields of intervention. Police militarization should be theorized as “colonial counter-insurgenization.”

Julian Go is Professor of Sociology at Boston University. Previously he was an Academy Scholar at the Academy for International and Area Studies of Harvard University. At BU, he is also a Faculty Affiliate in Asian Studies and the American Studies/New England Studies program. He has been a visiting scholar at the London School of Economics and Political Science, the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona, Lucerne University in Switzerland, and the Third World Studies Center at the University of the Philippines. He been elected council member and Chair of the Comparative-Historical Sociology Section and the Global & Transnational Sociology Sections of the American Sociological Association. Beyond serving on various editorial boards of scholarly journals he is the editor of Political Power and Social Theory. He received his B.A. in Sociology & Political Science from the University of Michigan (1992), his M.A. in sociology from the University of Chicago (1995) and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago (2000)

Ph.D. Candidate, Sociology and Criminology & Law
2018-2019 Rothman Doctoral Fellow

 

Tameka Samuels-Jones addressed questions about conflicting state regulations and indigenous cultural beliefs in the Blue and John Crow Mountains of Jamaica in her talk. Designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2015 the site is still threatened by illegal deforestation, water pollution, and poaching. Focusing on three groups — the maroons, Rastafarians, and local coffee farmers — Samuels-Jones’ work provided insight into the cultural and legal factors that determine how to govern natural resources successfully. Read More “Tameka Samuels-Jones”

“Regulatory Law and Local Stakeholder influences on Green Crime in the Blue Mountains, Jamaica.”

Rothman Doctoral Fellow

 

Samuels-Jones with one of the farmers in the Blue Mountains, Jamaica (PHOTO: Tameka Samuels-Jones)

Tameka Samuels-Jones addressed questions about conflicting state regulations and indigenous cultural beliefs in the Blue and John Crow Mountains of Jamaica in her talk. Designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2015 the site is still threatened by illegal deforestation, water pollution, and poaching. Focusing on three groups — the maroons, Rastafarians, and local coffee farmers — Samuels-Jones’ work provided insight into the cultural and legal factors that determine how to govern natural resources successfully.

Specifically, her dissertation research  examines how beliefs and cultural identities impact peoples’ compliance with state environmental regulations, and how non-compliance is managed.

With funds from her fellowship, Samuels-Jones traveled to the Blue and John Crow Mountains where there is ongoing environmental degradation from river contamination, deforestation, soil erosion, and solid waste dumping. She spent time with communities around Moore Town (a maroon community descended from escaped enslaved persons) and went on patrol with park rangers in Blue Mountains to get their perspective on groups engaged in environmentally damaging behavior. She also conducted document analysis to examine legislative documents and enforcement data.

She found that managing the area’s environmental health involved complex negotiations and combinations of state and NGO-co-management with individual local communities and their own socio-political and religious systems. Each group — the maroons, the Rastafarians, and the local farmers — all had their own political systems and engaged in different kinds of environmentally threatening behavior: maroons hunted protected coneys and were concerned about river poisoning, Rastafarians were concerned about habitat loss and encroachment, and local farmers used pesticides and slash/burn clearing. Furthermore, different religious laws produced varying perspectives on what kind of behavior is acceptable — or not — from an environmental point of view.

Samuels-Jones shared, “Trust, religion, and access to information all mediate how people decide to obey environmental law in complex ways.” She said, “as a result, each group may need a different incentive in order to obey environmental laws.”

Above all, Samuels-Jones advocated for a cultural sociological approach to environmental criminology/policy to help authorities understand the role of dialogue and stakeholder engagement in policy-making and to avoid situations of non-compliance by considering the cultural dynamics and belief systems of the various constituencies they have to work with.