*This event has been cancelled.*

The central question of this symposium is: How is the study of Islam a vital site for justifying the institutional life of the critical humanities, both as an academic discipline and a mode of public engagement? This event will give both speakers and attendees an opportunity to discuss/debate the place of Islam in the critical humanities. The four speakers have made rich contributions to this intellectual endeavor in multiple disciplinary arenas by deploying various media and genres and by elaborating key analytical models, such as multiple critique, Islamicate cosmopolitanism, transnational Muslim feminism, and Sufi aesthetics.

Speakers:

Sadia Abbas (Rutgers-Newark)
Miriam Cooke (Duke University)
Bruce B. Lawrence (Duke University)
Cyrus Ali Zargar (University of Central Florida)

*This event has been cancelled.*

The UF Department of Religion invites you to celebrate the installation of the Sheikh Fellowship in Islamic Studies.

Event Introduction by Terje Østebø (UF)

Speaker Introduction by Bruce B. Lawrence (Duke University)

Lecture by Ali Altaf Mian (UF)

Response by Sadia Abbas (Rutgers-Newark)

*This event has been cancelled.*

Nationality is the most important legal mechanism sorting and classifying the world’s population today. An individual’s place of birth or naturalization determines where he or she can and cannot be and what he or she can and cannot do. Although this system may appear universal, even natural, Will Hanley shows that it arose just a century ago. In Identifying with Nationality, he uses the Mediterranean city of Alexandria to develop a genealogy of the nation and the formation of the modern national subject.

Will Hanley is assistant professor of history at Florida State University.

This book talk is sponsored by the Center for Global Islamic Studies and the Department of History.

Unfortunately, Thursday evening’s book talk by Dr. Lâle Can has been cancelled due to travel concerns.

At the turn of the twentieth century, thousands of Central Asians made the annual pilgrimage to Mecca. Traveling long distances, many lived for extended periods in Ottoman cities dotting the routes. Though technically foreigners, these Muslim colonial subjects often blurred the lines between pilgrims and migrants. Not quite Ottoman, and not quite foreign, Central Asians became the sultan’s spiritual subjects. Their status was continually negotiated by Ottoman statesmen as attempts to exclude foreign Muslim nationals from the body politic were compromised by a changing international legal order and the caliphate’s ecumenical claims.

Lâle Can is Assistant Professor of History at The City College of New York, CUNY.

Sponsored by the Center for Global Islamic Studies and the Department of History.

Together with the award-winning Nigerian photographer Akintunde Akinleye, anthropologist Dr. Marloes Janson hit the road in the summer of 2013 to map the most important and busiest Nigerian road – the 120-kilometer long Lagos-Ibadan Expressway. While it has failed as the artery linking the north and the south of Nigeria, the highway has succeeded as a stage for the performance of public religiosity to the extent that it can be described as a ‘Spiritual Highway’. It owes this name to the fact that over the past three decades numerous Christian and Muslim prayer camps have sprung up along the highway. Despite the sharp division between Muslims and Christians in Nigerian society, the photographs visualize that the prayer camps have much in common in terms of both activities and discourse. The convergence of Christian and Muslim elements makes the Lagos-Ibadan Expressway a true crossroads. At this crossroads prayer camps act as road-builders in rendering meaningful the unstable flux of life in megacity Lagos.

Join Akinleye and Janson for this panel discussion, sponsored by the Center for Global Islamic Studies and the HARN Museum of Art.

Steven Weitzman is Abraham M. Ellis Professor of Hebrew and Semitic Languages and Literatures at the University of Pennsylvania, and the
Ella Darivoff Director of the Katz Center of Advanced Judaic Studies. Weitzman specializes in the Hebrew Bible and the origins of Jewish culture. Recent publications include The Origins of The Jews (Princeton, 2017); Surviving Sacrilege: Cultural Persistence in Jewish Antiquity (Harvard University Press, 2005); Religion and the Self in Antiquity (Indiana
University Press, 2005); The Jews: A History (Prentice Hall, 2009); and a biography of King Solomon, part of the new “Jewish Lives” series, published by Yale University Press in 2011.

Sponsored by the Center for Jewish Studies, the Bud Shorstein Professorship, the Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica, and the Center for Global Islamic Studies

The Center for Global Islamic Studies is organizing this Workshop as part of the Henry Luce Foundation project, “Islam and Africa in Global Context.”

The workshop will feature presentations on mediated religion and various media such as print, television, video, and the internet in Egypt, Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, Nigeria, and beyond by:

Hatsuki Aishima (National Museum of Ethnology, Osaka)
Musa Ibrahim (UF)
Sara Katz (Loyola University of New Orleans)
Frédérick Madore (UF)
Ali Mian (UF)

Sponsored by the Center for Global Islamic Studies, Center for African Studies, Islam in Africa Working Group, and Department of Religion.

The Center for Global Islamic Studies is organizing this lecture as part of the Henry Luce Foundation project, “Islam and Africa in Global Context.”

Dr. Ukah is a sociologist of religion and head of the department of Religious Studies at the University of Cape Town (South Africa).

Sponsored by the Center for Global Islamic Studies, Center for African Studies, Islam in Africa Working Group, and Department of Religion.