Ph.D. Candidate, History
2016-2017 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship

Ralph Patrello, a Ph.D. candidate in the History Department, used his 2016 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship to travel to Toulouse and Bordeaux to access archaeological site reports on cemeteries and ceramics relevant to his dissertation, “Power and Self-Representation in Southern Gaul, 395-600 AD.” Patrello’s work focuses on burial practices and grave goods from the area between the Loire River and the Pyrenees in what is today modern France. His analysis of belt buckle depositions in these early medieval graves serves to examine identity, social networking, and power structures in this period. Read More “Ralph Patrello”

Ph.D. Candidate, Education
2016-2017 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship

Kenneth Noble, a Ph.D. candidate in the College of Education studying schools, society, and culture, used his 2016 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship to Travel to Tucson, Arizona and Cincinnati, Ohio to complete archival research relevant to his dissertation, “Patrolling the Hallways: The History of Police Presence in Urban Public Schools.” Read More “Kenneth Noble”

Ph.D., History
2016-2017 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship

Brian Hamm, who received his Ph.D. in history in August 2017, used his Rothman Doctoral Fellowship during the summer of 2016 to travel to the Archivo General de Indias in Seville, Spain to access archival documents on the Spanish Inquisition for his dissertation, “Between the Foreign and the Familiar: The Portuguese, the Inquisition, and Local Society in Cartagena de Indias, 1550-1700.” In the wake of Columbus’ transformative voyages, the Spanish Crown spread its power throughout the New World in the sixteenth century, especially in the regions of modern-day Mexico and Peru. This imperial expansion was made possible through the efforts not only of Spaniards, but of many other groups as well. Of particular importance were the Portuguese, the richest and most influential of whom settled in the viceregal capitals of Mexico City and Lima. A number of these Portuguese elites would become victims of the Inquisition, accused of secretly practicing Judaism. Because of the wealth of inquisitorial documentation that has survived, combined with the great economic importance of these elites, many scholars have focused their analysis only on the wealthiest sectors of the Portuguese population. Unfortunately, this limited focus has generated broad generalizations about the Portuguese in colonial Spanish America. In order to avoid this conflation, this project examines Portuguese residents in other regions of Spanish America, particularly those in the Spanish Caribbean port cities Cartagena de Indias (in modern-day Colombia), which, during the colonial era, was an economically important but politically marginal locale. Read More “Brian Hamm”

Ph.D. Candidate, History
2016-2017 Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship

Nicholas Foreman, a Ph.D. candidate in the History Department, used his 2016 Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship to travel to New Orleans and Chicago to access archival documents and archaeological data for his dissertation, “The Calorie of Progress: Food and Culture in the Lower Mississippi Valley, 1760-1850.” In the nineteenth century, New Orleans was the jewel of the cotton South. Cotton covered millions of acres and became the barometer of economic success and development in the region. But the economic viability of cotton also crucially depended on local food production among non-elites: itinerant peddlers, urban huxters, and small farmers amongst them. The local food economy was in turn host to a diverse labor market and food culture in which free blacks, Native Americans, poor whites, and even enslaved peddlers contributed to the social and economic development New Orleans and the Lower Mississippi Valley. Read More “Nicholas Foreman”

Ph.D. Candidate, Religion
2016-2017 Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship

Bhakti Mamtora received a Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship to travel to Gujarat, India for archival and ethnographic fieldwork for her dissertation, “The Making of a Modern Scripture: The History of a Book from 19th-century Gujarat.” Her project analyzes the process of transforming oral narrative and culture into a sacred text by focusing on the Svāmīnī Vāto, a Gujarati sacred text.

Mamtora’s work, through both ethnographic and archival research, considers the ways in which sermons emerge and become revered as sacred texts in Western India. It takes the Swaminarayan Sampraday, a Hindu devotional tradition founded in Western India at the turn of the 19th-century, as a case study to examine the genesis, history, and reception of scripture in Hindu traditions. Mamtora studied glosses of the text and completed fieldwork at temples in order to explain the background or the literary context within which this genre and text emerged, and how sermons become sacred texts and influence the trajectory of religious traditions. She also examined the ways in which devotees of the Swaminarayan Sampraday practice and institutionalize these oral traditions, including through mobile phone apps, printed sermons, and other forms of written/digital culture.

Mamtora argues that without an adequate analysis of pretextual life, or the remnants of the processes by which oral teachings became text, we undervalue the social, cultural, and historical fields within which sacred texts emerged and influenced the development of religious traditions. Her project fills an existing gap in textual studies between work that focuses on historical significance and work studying present-day interpretations. This method allows her to access aspects of the text that are lost in other approaches and uncovers the pretextual and life of the texts as they are lived by religious adherents.

Department of English
2016 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

Dr. Jodi Schorb, Associate Professor in the Department of English, used her 2016 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to study primary materials in the Human Sexuality Collection at Cornell University and the Wilkinson collection at Yates County History Center, NY. Her current book-length manuscript project, Life Writing and the Eighteenth-Century Erotic Imaginary, explores sex and gender difference in eighteenth-century American life writing and seeks to expand our understanding of conceptions of sex and gender prior to the medicalization of sexuality and the rise of sexology. Read More “Jodi Schorb”

Department of Classics
2016 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

Dr. Jennifer Rea, Associate Professor in the Department of Classics, used her 2016 Rothman Faculty Fellowship to revise and finish the manuscript for her current book project, a graphic history entitled Perpetua’s Journey: Faith, Gender, and Power in the Roman Empire. Perpetua’s Journey combines sequential art and historical commentary to tell the story of Vibia Perpetua, a Christian woman and martyr, executed in Carthage during the birthday celebrations of the Roman emperor Septimius Severus’s son in 203 CE. Unlike previous scholarship that sometimes portrayed Perpetua as a willful and impulsive young woman who rebelled against the Roman authorities, Perpetua’s Journey presents Perpetua as a thoughtful, well-educated leader of her fellow prisoners and as their legal (and spiritual) intercessor – a role normally reserved for men in Roman society. Read More “Jennifer Rea”

Center for African American Studies
2016 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

Dr. Evan Hart, Visiting Assistant Professor in African American Studies, used her 2016 Rothman Faculty Fellowship to travel to Smith College to do archival research for her current book project, “Building an Inclusive Movement: the National Black Women’s Health Project and the Battle for Health, 1981-1994.” Founded in 1984 by Byllye Avery, The National Black Women’s Health Project was the first organization devoted solely to the health concerns of women of color in the United States. Their independence from the National Women’s Health Network raised red flags among mainstream feminists who argued that all women shared the same health care needs regardless of race. Dr. Hart argues that the subsequent debate amongst feminists about makes a social movement “inclusive” created new organizational strategies modeled by the National Black Women’s Health Project but also exposed fractures in the feminist movement. Read More “Evan Hart”

History
2016 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

Dr. Michelle Campos (Department of History), an Associate Professor studying the modern Middle East, used her 2016 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to travel to Jerusalem and conduct research relating to her current book project, Unmixing the Holy City, and an accompanying multi-media GIS project, “Jerusalem 1905.” Taken together, these projects will constitute a book project that is supplemented by a digital interface highlighting the social history of Jerusalem and the lived experience of Jerusalemites around the turn of the twentieth century. While the book project takes a look at the fifty year transformation from mixed imperial city to colonial and national capital, the digital project aims to provide a microhistorical view of the city in a single year and to engage the public in a discussion about different claims over Jerusalem. Read More “Michelle Campos”

Literatures, Languages, and Cultures
2016 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

Dr. Hélène Blondeau, Associate Professor of Languages, Literatures and Culture, used her 2016 Rothman Faculty Fellowship to travel to the United Kingdom, Belgium, and Canada. She used the trips to access research materials at the University of Montreal, and to consult other specialists in Brussels and Birmingham focusing on language variation and language identity in Montreal and Brussels. This will provide the foundation for her current project which compares the role of French in the two cities and the impact that historical developments, contemporary migrations, and multicultural contact have had on the two local varieties of French. Read More “Hélène Blondeau”