Ph.D. Candidate, History
2014-2015 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship

Andrew Welton, Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History used his 2014 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship to travel to the United Kingdom and explore important museum collections, research libraries, and collect data from the field. This research furthered his dissertation project exploring the ancient artifacts, specifically medieval spears, of early Anglo-Saxon England. In his talk, “Spears, Smiths, and Iron in Anglo-Saxon England,” Welton discusses how raw materials, weapons, and the men who crafted them were intricately woven together in early medieval society. Spears were more than passive objects to be used by the soldier; they were social objects which possessed a unique and valuable agency. By considering the social lives of spears, Welton shows that new questions can be posed about the relationship of archaeology to history, as well as the relationship of material objects to social practice. Read More “Andrew Welton”

Ph.D. Candidate, English
2014-2015 Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship

Yeonhaun Kang, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English at the University of Florida, used her Tedder Doctoral Fellowship to travel to the National Museum of American History and the National Agricultural Library in Washington, D.C. Kang’s research highlights how the garden has played a crucial role in shaping national identity and environmental ownership in the U.S. The garden has traditionally been represented as space of tranquility, as well as a bridge between the natural world and the human-built environment. However, Kang argues that this representation of the garden is based on a white man’s perspective and that contemporary U.S. multiethnic women’s garden literature helps us expand our understanding of nature beyond white man’s imagination by bringing diverse ethnic groups (Native Americans, African Americans, and Asian Americans) into the tradition of American nature writing. Read More “Yeonhaun Kang”

Ph.D. Candidate, Political Science
2014-2015 Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship

Kevin Funk, Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Political Science, used his 2014 Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship in the Humanities to further his dissertation project entitled, “Capitalists of the World Unite? Locating an Imagined Community of Transnational Capitalists in Latin America’s Booming Relations with the Arab World.” In this project, Funk questions the existence of a so-called “transnational capitalist class” in the business relations between Latin America and the Arab world. This identification of economic elites who possess a globalized, cosmopolitan mindset because of international commercial exchange is misleading. Instead, Funk argues, these economic elites retain national and territorial identities. Read More “Kevin Funk”

Ph.D. Candidate, Anthropology
2014-2015 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship

Deborah Andrews, Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Florida used her Rothman Doctoral Fellowship to travel to the Puno region of Peru in summer 2014 to investigate whether or not globalization has negatively impacted the agro-diversity of local quinoa markets in the Peruvian Andes. Her investigation revealed that globalization has had limited negative impact on quinoa agro-diversity since the market initially favored white varieties but recently has embraced other colorful varieties, in particular red quinoa. Read More “Deborah Andrews”

Department of Philosophy
2014 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

Dr. Peter Westmoreland used his 2014 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to support the writing of a long journal article entitled, “Giving Philosophy a Hand: Left and Right in Swordplay, Brains, and Lived Experience,” which will be submitted for publication in 2015. Westmoreland’s research questions the normative belief that left-and right-handed people are mirror-images of one another. Current scientific research into handedness has been shaped by the assumption of symmetry. Instead of focusing on how handedness is experienced everyday by left and right handers, neuro-science has looked for the difference in the brain. Philosophers, despite interest in the body as a center of experience, have not pursued any kind of robust analysis of the experience of handedness. In order to correct these omissions, Westmoreland argues that left-and right-handers embody their handedness differently because their experiences of the world are different – they develop different kinds of skills, styles, and preferences. Read More “Peter Westmoreland”

Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies
2014 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

Dr. Ana de Prada Pérez, a faculty member in the University of Florida’s Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies, used her 2014 Rothman Summer Faculty Fellowship to conduct research on bilingualism in Minorca, Spain. In particular, de Prada Pérez focused on the phenomenon of code-switching, or the ability of bilingual speakers to alternate between two languages in spoken discourse. Some of her previous research examined code-switching between English and Spanish; this project studied a different linguistic pair – Catalan and Spanish. By comparing and contrasting these two linguistic pairs through the common denominator of Spanish, she found that differences appear that suggest that formal rules of language use influence when and how code-switching occurs. Code-switching is not the devolution of language, but rather embodies linguistic flexibility and creativity. Read More “Ana de Prada Pérez”

School of Art + Art History
2014 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

Dr. Maya Stanfield-Mazzi used her 2014 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to begin writing a second book manuscript addressing how Amerindian artisans visually articulated Catholicism through church textiles and embroidery after the Spanish conquest. The Spanish colonial period (ca. 1520-1820) is commonly viewed as characterized by the imposition of foreign religious culture on indigenous peoples. However, as Stanfield-Mazzi argues, the evidence of textiles and embroidery weave a different story. Rather than coercion emanating from the colonial center, Stanfield-Mazzi argues that there was a cultural mechanism of push and pull. Indigenous artisans utilized traditional materials and techniques to produce Church textiles and tapestries with Catholic iconography. This affected local churches as much as it affected the colonized peoples.
Read More “Maya Stanfield-Mazzi”

School of Theatre and Dance
2014 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

Kevin Marshall, a faculty member of the University of Florida School of Theatre and Dance and Director of the Center for Art & Public Policy, used his 2014 Rothman Summer Faculty Fellowship to write the play Gator Tales. Gator Tales delves into the history of racial integration at the University of Florida (UF) by bringing oral histories of UF’s first black alumni to life on stage. Read More “Kevin Marshall”

Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures
2014 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

Dr. Ben Hebblethwaite used his 2014 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to travel to Paris, France to study the influence of Islam on French language and culture as part of a long-term book project. In particular, Dr. Hebblethwaite explored the linguistic contact between vernacular French and Arabic through rap music created by French Muslims. Dr. Hebblethwaite’s research suggests that common religious idioms and vocabulary unique to Arabic overlap into vernacular French through rap music, which forms a common set of cultural terms shared by both languages and their speakers. Although this common set of shared terms, or lexical borrowings, is hardly universal, it nevertheless indicates a broader cultural awareness of the religious lexical field of Islam. Read More “Ben Hebblethwaite”

School of Music
2014 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

Dr. Margaret Butler used her 2014 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to support work on a second book manuscript, “Opera in the Age of Reform: Traetta, Parma, and the Rhetoric of Innovation.” The setting for her research is the eighteenth century, when the northern Italian city of Parma came under the control of the Bourbon royal house after it was ceded by the Hapsburgs in the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle in 1748. During this period, the traditional Italian genre of opera seria was criticized for its lack of dramatic unity due to the dominance of powerful solo singers and unruly audiences. Read More “Margaret Butler”