Ph.D. Candidate, Anthropology
2013-2014 Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship

Ryan Morini, Ph.D. candidate in Anthropology, used his Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship to explore Western Shoshone communities in eastern Nevada and examine the effects of United States federal heritage management policies on Shoshone heritage. His primary purpose was to understand the role, practice, and definition of “heritage” for the Shoshone tribe in order to assess how well the federal government embraces this idea in public management of land, resources and cultural preservation. Morini ultimately asks, how might we understand and record Shoshone heritage, and what are the implications if the U.S. federal government misrepresents a culture? Read More “Ryan Morini”

Ph.D. Candidate, History
2013-2014 Rothman Doctral Fellowship

Ph.D. candidate Anna Lankina used her 2013 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship to further her research on the heretical figure of Philostorgius in antiquity and ecclesiastical history, the history of the Christian church. Most ecclesiastical studies of the Greco-Roman world generally follow the history of the Roman Church, which was the reigning and defining body for spiritual doctrine of the time. In her dissertation research, Lankina retraces the life and writings of Philostorgius in order to reinsert his voice back into the orthodox and pagan histories of antiquity. In so doing, Lankina reveals a new, dynamic conversation at work, with many separate voices competing for the economic, political and religious power to narrate the history of the Christian church. Read More “Anna Lankina”

Ph.D. Candidate, History
2013-2014 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship

Allen Kent, Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History, used the Rothman Doctoral Fellowship to research the role of the African American Patrolmen’s League in Chicago, IL, from 1968 to 1973, and its connections to the concurrent Black Power Movement in the United States. Kent focused his research on three major points of investigation: when and why was the AAPL founded? How did the AAPL organize around the use of the rhetoric and symbolism association with the Black Power Movement? And how did the black police officer negotiate his complex position as a site for mediation within Chicago social and political societies? Kent focuses on race, power, and historical social movements to show how small, sometimes marginalized organizations offer important insight into democracy at work in American history. Read More “Allen Kent”

Ph.D. Candidate, History
2013-2014 Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship

Ph.D. candidate in History, Nicole Cox, used her Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship to research the wood-preservation industry and the making of superfund sites from the early twentieth century to the present day. While much attention concerning superfund sites is focused on the present-day clean-up efforts, there is a lack of historical information on how such hazardous waste sites were created and the social impacts of handling hazardous chemicals. Cox focused her research on wood-treatment facilities in the American South particularly locations in Gainesville, Florida; Texarkana, Texas; Macon, Georgia; and Norfolk, Virginia. Her findings show how the absence of historical data about many superfund sites makes it difficult to prevent such sites from appearing in the future. Cox discovers that there is still a significant need to confront these toxic sites and consider their placement within our global, industrial, historical and environmental past. Read More “Nicole Cox”

Classics
2013 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

Prof. Robert Wagman used the Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to work on a book project titled Beliefs of Modern Greece (BMG), an annotated English translation of Leo Allatius’ De Graecorum hodie quorundam opinationibus from 1645. BMG is the first comprehensive treatment of Greek folklore ever published and has never been translated into to English. Furthermore, BMG is not easily accessible and is often only quoted (by modern scholars) in parts or excerpts due to the small number of copies available mostly in Europe. Even an original text, once found, is hard to read because its abbreviations and symbols are difficult to understand without practice and training in early Greek fonts. All of these concerns combine to show the need for an English translation of BMG. Read More “Robert Wagman”

Classics
2013 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

Prof. Jennifer Rea used her 2013 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to complete her book project Empire Without End: Science Fiction, Fantasy and the Augustan Poets. In this book, she explores classical narratives, such as Vergil’s Aeneid, that permeate our culture. What, she asks, are the costs of empire without end? What will be our limit of sacrifice for personal freedom? And what sacrifices do we ask of those who become heroes to us? Read More “Jennifer Rea”

Religion
2013 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

Professor Robert Kawashima used his 2013 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to continue work on his book manuscript The Archaeology of Ancient Israelite Knowledge. Kawashima’s book examines the intellectual-historical significance of Israelite religion within the context of the ancient Mediterranean world. Dr. Kawashima investigates what is often referred to as the monotheistic revolution and, in particular, ancient Israelite religious thought from the monarchical period (1000-586 B.C.E.). Invoking Foucault’s historical-epistemological project, the “archaeology of knowledge,” Kawashima argues that ancient Israelite religion, breaking with the system of myth, existed as a distinct system of knowledge for several centuries until the dawn of Jewish apocalypticism (perhaps as early as the 5th century B.C.E.). In this way, ancient Israelite thought paved the way for that Jewish apocalyptic sect now known as early Christianity, and thus occupies a significant place in the intellectual history of the West. Read More “Robert Kawashima”

Classics
2013 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship

Dr. Eleni Bozia used her 2013 Rothman Faculty Summer Fellowship to travel to Rome, Italy, where she completed the 3D scanning of statues at Palazzo Altemps – Soprintendeza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Roma under the supervision of archaeologist and curator Dr. Alessandra Capodiferro. The completion of this project allowed Dr. Bozia to populate the 3D Virtual Museum of World Heritage, which is part of the UF Digital Epigraphy and Archaeology Project, a joint project with computer engineer Prof. Angelos Barmpoutis (CISE/Digital Worlds), Prof. Robert Wagman (Classics Department), and several other scholars from acclaimed American and European Universities and Institutions. The Digital Epigraphy Toolbox is a novel and technologically-advanced scientific tool for the effective study and comparative analysis of Greek and Latin inscriptions. It provides archaeologists and epigraphists with a cost-effective and efficient method for 3D digitization of inscriptions based on ektypa (paper casts, impressions of inscriptions on a paper) as well as access to an online dynamic library of 3D inscriptions. The Virtual Museum of World Heritage is a virtual interactive 3D museum featuring significant world-heritage exhibits. Read More “Eleni Bozia”

Education Curator of Academic Programs, Harn Museum of Art

In collaboration with Ivy Chen
Bishop Studies Center Manager, Harn Museum of Art

2013-2014 Library Enhancement Grant

Dr. Eric Segal received a library enhancement grant to support acquisitions for the Bishop Studies Center (BSC) at the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art. The BSC under the leadership of Ivy Chen provides visitors to the Harn Museum a number of multimedia and hands-on resources for extended study in art and culture. This grant supports the acquisition of artist monographs, books, and DVDs directly related to current exhibitions, as well as significant scholarly publications selected by museum curators. Visitors to the Harn can spend time in the BSC to learn more about the artists and cultural contexts they encounter in the museum exhibits. Read More “Eric Segal”

Department of English
2013-2014 Library Enhancement Grant

Professor Malini Johar Schueller, Professor of English and Director of the Asian American Studies Certificate Program, has received a Library Enhancement Grant to increase UF library holdings in Asian American Studies. Since the certificate program opened its doors at UF in 2004, students and faculty have expressed great enthusiasm for more resources in this area. Books and media purchased through this grant for the UF library will better serve students’ needs and facilitate ongoing graduate and faculty research. Read More “Malini Johar Schueller”