Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship

In 2012, the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, with the support of the Tedder Family Endowed Research Award in the Humanities, began a program to award summer fellowships to doctoral candidates working on humanities topics who have passed their qualifying exams by the application deadline. This fellowship may be used to cover research expenses, including travel, related to their dissertation project. Work on projects with interdisciplinary appeal is particularly encouraged. Additional awards may be granted

2017-2018 Doctoral Fellows
2016-2017 Doctoral Fellows
2015-2016 Doctoral Fellows
2014-2015 Doctoral Fellows
2013-2014 Doctoral Fellows
2012-2013 Doctoral Fellows



      2016–2017

    • Ralph Patrello

      Ph.D. Candidate, History
      2016-2017 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship

      Ralph Patrello, a Ph.D. candidate in the History Department, used his 2016 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship to travel to Toulouse and Bordeaux to access archaeological site reports on cemeteries and ceramics relevant to his dissertation, “Power and Self-Representation in Southern Gaul, 395-600 AD.” Patrello’s work focuses on burial practices and grave goods from the area between the Loire River and the Pyrenees in what is today modern France. His analysis of belt buckle depositions in these early medieval graves serves to examine identity, social networking, and power structures in this period.

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    • Kenneth Noble

      Ph.D. Candidate, Education
      2016-2017 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship

      Kenneth Noble, a Ph.D. candidate in the College of Education studying schools, society, and culture, used his 2016 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship to Travel to Tucson, Arizona and Cincinnati, Ohio to complete archival research relevant to his dissertation, “Patrolling the Hallways: The History of Police Presence in Urban Public Schools.”

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    • Brian Hamm

      Ph.D., History
      2016-2017 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship

      Brian Hamm, who received his Ph.D. in history in August 2017, used his Rothman Doctoral Fellowship during the summer of 2016 to travel to the Archivo General de Indias in Seville, Spain to access archival documents on the Spanish Inquisition for his dissertation, “Between the Foreign and the Familiar: The Portuguese, the Inquisition, and Local Society in Cartagena de Indias, 1550-1700.” In the wake of Columbus’ transformative voyages, the Spanish Crown spread its power throughout the New World in the sixteenth century, especially in the regions of modern-day Mexico and Peru. This imperial expansion was made possible through the efforts not only of Spaniards, but of many other groups as well. Of particular importance were the Portuguese, the richest and most influential of whom settled in the viceregal capitals of Mexico City and Lima. A number of these Portuguese elites would become victims of the Inquisition, accused of secretly practicing Judaism. Because of the wealth of inquisitorial documentation that has survived, combined with the great economic importance of these elites, many scholars have focused their analysis only on the wealthiest sectors of the Portuguese population. Unfortunately, this limited focus has generated broad generalizations about the Portuguese in colonial Spanish America. In order to avoid this conflation, this project examines Portuguese residents in other regions of Spanish America, particularly those in the Spanish Caribbean port cities Cartagena de Indias (in modern-day Colombia), which, during the colonial era, was an economically important but politically marginal locale.

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    • Nicholas Foreman

      Ph.D. Candidate, History
      2016-2017 Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship

      Nicholas Foreman, a Ph.D. candidate in the History Department, used his 2016 Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship to travel to New Orleans and Chicago to access archival documents and archaeological data for his dissertation, “The Calorie of Progress: Food and Culture in the Lower Mississippi Valley, 1760-1850.” In the nineteenth century, New Orleans was the jewel of the cotton South. Cotton covered millions of acres and became the barometer of economic success and development in the region. But the economic viability of cotton also crucially depended on local food production among non-elites: itinerant peddlers, urban huxters, and small farmers amongst them. The local food economy was in turn host to a diverse labor market and food culture in which free blacks, Native Americans, poor whites, and even enslaved peddlers contributed to the social and economic development New Orleans and the Lower Mississippi Valley.

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    • Bhakti Mamtora

      Department of Religion
      Bhakti Mamtora received a Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship to travel to Gujarat, India for archival and ethnographic fieldwork for her dissertation, “The Making of a Modern Scripture: The History of a Book from 19th-century Gujarat.” Her project analyzes the process of transforming oral narrative and culture into a sacred text by focusing on the Svāmīnī Vāto, a Gujarati sacred text.

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      2015–2016

    • Michael Vincent

      School of Music
      2015-2016 Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship

      Michael Vincent, a Ph.D. candidate in Musicology, used his 2015-2016 Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship to travel to Paris and Berlin for archival work. His dissertation, “Cosmopolitan Culture in Boccherini’s Madrid, 1785-1800” examines the unpublished musical manuscripts of Luigi Boccherini housed in the Bibliothèque National in Paris and the Deutsche Staatsbibliothek in Berlin. Boccherini, an Italian composer who spent much of his professional life in Madrid during the heyday of Europe’s Enlightenment, composed music in a predominantly Italian style but incorporated a variety of different musical techniques. Boccherini’s music produced in Madrid a cosmopolitan attitude inspired by the Enlightenment.

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    • Alana Lord

      Ph.D. Candidate, History
      2015-2016 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship

      Alana Lord, Ph.D. candidate is History, used her 2015 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship to travel to Spain and conduct archival research in the cities of Barcelona, Huesca, and Lleida. Her dissertation, “Constructing Royal Power: Host Desecration and Kingship in the Fourteenth-Century Crown of Aragon,” examines debates about royal power that took place between members of the royal family, the nobility, and cities about the appropriate form of kingship in the Crown of Aragon. In the late-fourteenth century, wealthy Jews within the kingdoms of Aragon and Catalonia were accused of stealing consecrated pieces of the Eucharist, the sacrament of Christ’s body and blood. The resulting Eucharist desecration trials raised political tensions between Pere III (r. 1336-1387), who sought to protect the Jews, and his son the Crown Prince of Aragon Joan I (r. 1387-1396) who relentlessly pursued the accusations.

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    • Brandon Jett

      Ph.D. Candidate, History
      2015-2016 Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship

      Brandon Jett, a Ph.D. candidate in the History Department, used his 2015 Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship to conduct archival research in the Birmingham City Archives in Birmingham, Alabama. His dissertation explores the complex web of interactions between African-American communities and the police in the Jim Crow South in the cities of Memphis, New Orleans, and Birmingham from the late nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. Violence and abuse are words most strongly associated with the relationship between African Americans and the police. However, Jett shows how African Americans in the early decades of the twentieth century did not always associate the police with violence and oppression. Rather, African Americans often called on the police to protect their lives and livelihoods. Distrust and police abuse were certainly widespread in the Jim Crow South, but this did not always define the interactions between African Americans and police or prevent African Americans from using law enforcement to advance their own needs.

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    • John Hames

      Ph.D. Candidate, Anthropology
      2015-2016 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship

      John Hames, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Anthropology, used his 2015-2016 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship to conduct anthropological fieldwork in the West African countries of Senegal and Mauritania. His fieldwork contributed to his dissertation entitled, “Activism and the Politics of Language Loyalty: The Pulaar Movement in Senegal and Mauritania.” Although Pulaar is not the official language of Senegal or Mauritania, it is a set of dialects of a language, also known as Fulfulde, that is spoken from Senegal to as far east as Sudan. Since independence from the France in 1960, Pulaar language activists have pursued and advocated for the dissemination of the Pulaar language in Senegal and Mauritania. Many of these activists have ties to the Fuuta Tooro region straddling the Senegal-Mauritania border and are known as the Haalpulaar’en.

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    • Rebecca Devlin

      Ph.D. Candidate, History
      2015-2016 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship

      Rebecca Devlin, a Ph.D. candidate in the History Department, used her 2015 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship to conduct further research on her dissertation entitled, “Bishops and Community in Northwestern Hispania: Transforming Roman Society, ca. 370 to 470 C.E.” In this project, Devlin explores the expanding social role of bishops after the conversion of Constantine by focusing on specific clerical communities in Gallaecia, a Roman province in the northwestern Iberian Peninsula. Devlin builds on recent trends in historical and archaeological inquiry that view the collapse of the Western Roman Empire, the expansion of Christianity and the emergence of medieval society as part of a long process of social, political and cultural transformation.

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      2014–2015

    • Andrew Welton

      Ph.D. Candidate, History
      2014-2015 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship

      Andrew Welton, Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History used his 2014 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship to travel to the United Kingdom and explore important museum collections, research libraries, and collect data from the field. This research furthered his dissertation project exploring the ancient artifacts, specifically medieval spears, of early Anglo-Saxon England. In his talk, “Spears, Smiths, and Iron in Anglo-Saxon England,” Welton discusses how raw materials, weapons, and the men who crafted them were intricately woven together in early medieval society. Spears were more than passive objects to be used by the soldier; they were social objects which possessed a unique and valuable agency. By considering the social lives of spears, Welton shows that new questions can be posed about the relationship of archaeology to history, as well as the relationship of material objects to social practice.

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    • Yeonhaun Kang

      Ph.D. Candidate, English
      2014-2015 Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship

      Yeonhaun Kang, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English at the University of Florida, used her Tedder Doctoral Fellowship to travel to the National Museum of American History and the National Agricultural Library in Washington, D.C. Kang’s research highlights how the garden has played a crucial role in shaping national identity and environmental ownership in the U.S. The garden has traditionally been represented as space of tranquility, as well as a bridge between the natural world and the human-built environment. However, Kang argues that this representation of the garden is based on a white man’s perspective and that contemporary U.S. multiethnic women’s garden literature helps us expand our understanding of nature beyond white man’s imagination by bringing diverse ethnic groups (Native Americans, African Americans, and Asian Americans) into the tradition of American nature writing.

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    • Kevin Funk

      Ph.D. Candidate, Political Science
      2014-2015 Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship

      Kevin Funk, Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Political Science, used his 2014 Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship in the Humanities to further his dissertation project entitled, “Capitalists of the World Unite? Locating an Imagined Community of Transnational Capitalists in Latin America’s Booming Relations with the Arab World.” In this project, Funk questions the existence of a so-called “transnational capitalist class” in the business relations between Latin America and the Arab world. This identification of economic elites who possess a globalized, cosmopolitan mindset because of international commercial exchange is misleading. Instead, Funk argues, these economic elites retain national and territorial identities.

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    • Deborah Andrews

      Ph.D. Candidate, Anthropology
      2014-2015 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship

      Deborah Andrews, Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Florida used her Rothman Doctoral Fellowship to travel to the Puno region of Peru in summer 2014 to investigate whether or not globalization has negatively impacted the agro-diversity of local quinoa markets in the Peruvian Andes. Her investigation revealed that globalization has had limited negative impact on quinoa agro-diversity since the market initially favored white varieties but recently has embraced other colorful varieties, in particular red quinoa.

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      2013–2014

    • Ryan Morini

      Ph.D. Candidate, Anthropology
      2013-2014 Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship

      Ryan Morini, Ph.D. candidate in Anthropology, used his Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship to explore Western Shoshone communities in eastern Nevada and examine the effects of United States federal heritage management policies on Shoshone heritage. His primary purpose was to understand the role, practice, and definition of “heritage” for the Shoshone tribe in order to assess how well the federal government embraces this idea in public management of land, resources and cultural preservation. Morini ultimately asks, how might we understand and record Shoshone heritage, and what are the implications if the U.S. federal government misrepresents a culture?

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    • Anna Lankina

      Ph.D. Candidate, History
      2013-2014 Rothman Doctral Fellowship

      Ph.D. candidate Anna Lankina used her 2013 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship to further her research on the heretical figure of Philostorgius in antiquity and ecclesiastical history, the history of the Christian church. Most ecclesiastical studies of the Greco-Roman world generally follow the history of the Roman Church, which was the reigning and defining body for spiritual doctrine of the time. In her dissertation research, Lankina retraces the life and writings of Philostorgius in order to reinsert his voice back into the orthodox and pagan histories of antiquity. In so doing, Lankina reveals a new, dynamic conversation at work, with many separate voices competing for the economic, political and religious power to narrate the history of the Christian church.

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    • Allen Kent

      Ph.D. Candidate, History
      2013-2014 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship

      Allen Kent, Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History, used the Rothman Doctoral Fellowship to research the role of the African American Patrolmen’s League in Chicago, IL, from 1968 to 1973, and its connections to the concurrent Black Power Movement in the United States. Kent focused his research on three major points of investigation: when and why was the AAPL founded? How did the AAPL organize around the use of the rhetoric and symbolism association with the Black Power Movement? And how did the black police officer negotiate his complex position as a site for mediation within Chicago social and political societies? Kent focuses on race, power, and historical social movements to show how small, sometimes marginalized organizations offer important insight into democracy at work in American history.

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    • Nicole Cox

      Ph.D. Candidate, History
      2013-2014 Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship

      Ph.D. candidate in History, Nicole Cox, used her Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship to research the wood-preservation industry and the making of superfund sites from the early twentieth century to the present day. While much attention concerning superfund sites is focused on the present-day clean-up efforts, there is a lack of historical information on how such hazardous waste sites were created and the social impacts of handling hazardous chemicals. Cox focused her research on wood-treatment facilities in the American South particularly locations in Gainesville, Florida; Texarkana, Texas; Macon, Georgia; and Norfolk, Virginia. Her findings show how the absence of historical data about many superfund sites makes it difficult to prevent such sites from appearing in the future. Cox discovers that there is still a significant need to confront these toxic sites and consider their placement within our global, industrial, historical and environmental past.

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      2012–2013

    • Robin Globus Veldman

      Ph.D. Candidate, Religion
      2012-2013 Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship

      During the summer of 2012, Tedder Family Doctoral Fellow Robin Globus Veldman conducted three months of research exploring the philosophical differences between environmentalists’ claims regarding the phenomenon of climate change and the traditional, Biblical worldview held among many Southern Baptists. The research was part of her dissertation project—titled “An Inconvenient Faith? Christianity, Climate Change and the End of the World”—which examines how conservative Christians view climate change, the environment and environmentalism. By exploring the viewpoint of the one of the most skeptical religious segments in the country on climate change, her project sheds new light on how religious beliefs shape and inform adherents’ social and political opinions, with an emphasis on how religions both encourage and resist transformation of belief.

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    • Andrei Gandila

      Ph.D. Candidate, History
      2012-2013 Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship

      Andrei Gandila received a 2012 Tedder Doctoral Summer Fellowship in support of his project, “Marginal Money: Coins, Frontiers, and Barbarians in Early Byzantium (6th-7th Centuries).” In this project, Gandila explores the significance of the frontier between the Byzantine Empire and neighboring societies during the 6th and 7th centuries in the area of the lower Danube in modern Romania. Gandila argues that we need to redefine the meaning of imperial frontiers, since the region was permeated by cross-border trade, intellectual and cultural exchange. His multidisciplinary approach draws from archaeology, anthropology, and history, with particular focus on the production, exchange, and innovative uses of coins beyond the Eastern Roman frontier.

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    • Stéphanie Borios

      Department of Anthropology
      2012-2013 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship

      Stéphanie Borios was awarded a Rothman Doctoral Fellowship for her project “Children’s Social Learning of Plants in the Peruvian Andes.” Borios used her fellowship to spend eight months conducting research in the Peruvian Andes. After taking an intensive summer Quechua class in Cusco, she spent most of her time in a small rural community, studying the social relationships and learning strategies on which children rely to learn about plants. She was especially interested in evaluating the importance that peers play in this learning process and how information transmission occurs in daily activities and relies on observation, play and work.

      For her study, Borios selected a community close to Calca, Peru. In this community, families mainly engage in subsistence agriculture, herding, and weaving. Natural resources are thus critical to the development of their activities and their identity. Borios studied this cultural transmission of plant knowledge as children engage with other members of their community in activities such as farming, herding, cooking, collecting firewood, and playing. She conducted her fieldwork with children and youth aged four to eighteen years old and combined ethnographic methods (participant observation and ethnographic interviews), free-listings, drawings, and a plant knowledge test.

      With this research she contributes to the anthropology of childhood, bringing new insights into the dynamics of cultural transmission and children’s agency in this process. Her research also addresses a need in this field for studies about knowledge transmission beyond formal schooling. Our conception of what constitutes learning is biased towards modern Western methods of learning, with verbal instruction from the schoolteacher to the pupil, and through writing. It is important to reflect on the diversity and richness of cultural transmission under other circumstances, especially to look at the knowledge that rural children acquire from a very early age taking part in household and communal activities.

      This research has become the basis of Borios’s dissertation. She has already presented portions of the research conducted as a Rothman Doctoral Fellow to the Society for Psychological Anthropology with the American Anthropological Association’s Anthropology of Children and Youth Interest Group, the Florida Anthropological Student Association, and the Society for Economic Botany. She will also present it at the 112th American Anthropological Association annual meeting which will be held in November 2013 in Chicago, Illinois. As she concludes her analysis, she intends to disseminate her results to schools in the community where she worked and in Cusco or Lima, Peru. This will help to share rural children’s experiences and ways of learning with their urban peers. Borios also plans to prepare a travelling exhibition for schools in the Gainesville area to promote intercultural awareness between children in the Andes and Florida.

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