Ph.D. Candidate, Political Science
2018-2019 Rothman Doctoral Fellow

Alexandria Wilson received a Rothman Doctoral Fellowship for her dissertation project titled “Framing Exploitation: The Women’s Movement and Anti-trafficking Policy in East Central Europe.” She used her funds to conduct fieldwork in the Czech Republic, Poland, and Slovakia.

Ph.D. Candidate, History
2018-2019 Tedder Doctoral Fellow

J. Lucien D. (Luc) Houle is the Program Coordinator at the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere.  He was awarded the 2019 Waldo W. Neikirk Award for the Graduate Student Summer Residency at the National Humanities Center.  He earned his B. A. in History from University of North Florida and his M. A. in History from the University of Florida.

Luc received a Tedder Doctoral Fellowship for his dissertation project titled “On the Margins of Medieval Power: Ramon Berenguer V and Mobility,” which explores how power functioned in thirteenth-century Provence and the implications of this for a broader understanding of mobility and power in the Middle Ages. Read More “Luc Houle”

Ph.D. Candidate, Religion
2018-2019 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship

In her dissertation, The Goddess and Dancing Śiva in the Multiple Ritual Worlds of Chidambaram Shaw takes a Goddesscentric approach to the stories and life of Chidambaram, which is a temple town famous for being home to Dancing Śiva. This approach allows her to explore a myriad of narrative layers, which are often overlooked when a study focuses upon a male deity and the elite males who worship him. Her overarching research questions ask: how does turning to Goddess stories, to the Goddess within the God stories, to marginalized voices along with elite ones, and to the practices of regular people enrich the historical archive? How does this grow our understanding of Hindu temples and Hindu Traditions? Read More “Jodi Shaw”

Ph.D. Candidate, Sociology and Criminology & Law
2018-2019 Rothman Doctoral Fellow

 

Tameka Samuels-Jones addressed questions about conflicting state regulations and indigenous cultural beliefs in the Blue and John Crow Mountains of Jamaica in her talk. Designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2015 the site is still threatened by illegal deforestation, water pollution, and poaching. Focusing on three groups — the maroons, Rastafarians, and local coffee farmers — Samuels-Jones’ work provided insight into the cultural and legal factors that determine how to govern natural resources successfully. Read More “Tameka Samuels-Jones”

Ph.D. Candidate, Education
2018-2019 Rothman Doctoral Fellow

Currin’s research addresses the “Age of Accountability,” a decades-long period defined by top-down education reforms that position teachers as both the problem and the potential solution for America’s so-called failing public schools. This, Currin argues, leads to increased teacher stress, a loss of creativity, and a shift in teachers’ answering to superiors rather than their own students. Read More “Elizabeth Currin, Department of Education”

“Regulatory Law and Local Stakeholder influences on Green Crime in the Blue Mountains, Jamaica.”

Rothman Doctoral Fellow

 

Samuels-Jones with one of the farmers in the Blue Mountains, Jamaica (PHOTO: Tameka Samuels-Jones)

Tameka Samuels-Jones addressed questions about conflicting state regulations and indigenous cultural beliefs in the Blue and John Crow Mountains of Jamaica in her talk. Designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2015 the site is still threatened by illegal deforestation, water pollution, and poaching. Focusing on three groups — the maroons, Rastafarians, and local coffee farmers — Samuels-Jones’ work provided insight into the cultural and legal factors that determine how to govern natural resources successfully.

Specifically, her dissertation research  examines how beliefs and cultural identities impact peoples’ compliance with state environmental regulations, and how non-compliance is managed.

With funds from her fellowship, Samuels-Jones traveled to the Blue and John Crow Mountains where there is ongoing environmental degradation from river contamination, deforestation, soil erosion, and solid waste dumping. She spent time with communities around Moore Town (a maroon community descended from escaped enslaved persons) and went on patrol with park rangers in Blue Mountains to get their perspective on groups engaged in environmentally damaging behavior. She also conducted document analysis to examine legislative documents and enforcement data.

She found that managing the area’s environmental health involved complex negotiations and combinations of state and NGO-co-management with individual local communities and their own socio-political and religious systems. Each group — the maroons, the Rastafarians, and the local farmers — all had their own political systems and engaged in different kinds of environmentally threatening behavior: maroons hunted protected coneys and were concerned about river poisoning, Rastafarians were concerned about habitat loss and encroachment, and local farmers used pesticides and slash/burn clearing. Furthermore, different religious laws produced varying perspectives on what kind of behavior is acceptable — or not — from an environmental point of view.

Samuels-Jones shared, “Trust, religion, and access to information all mediate how people decide to obey environmental law in complex ways.” She said, “as a result, each group may need a different incentive in order to obey environmental laws.”

Above all, Samuels-Jones advocated for a cultural sociological approach to environmental criminology/policy to help authorities understand the role of dialogue and stakeholder engagement in policy-making and to avoid situations of non-compliance by considering the cultural dynamics and belief systems of the various constituencies they have to work with.

Ph.D. Candidate, History
2018-2019 Rothman Doctoral Fellow

Strickland researched the lives of enslaved people on Codrington Plantation on Barbados and the role of religious conversion that occurred there from 1710 to emancipation in 1838. Read More “Matthew Strickland”

Department of History
2017-2018 Rothman Doctoral Fellow

Matthew Simmons received a Rothman Doctoral Fellowship for his project entitled “Revolt in the Fields: The Southern Tenant Farmers’ Union and the New Deal.” He traveled to the Oklahoma Historical Society and the Western Historical Collections at the University of Oklahoma to access histories of underprivileged American Southerners in order to research the dynamics of social inequality during the Great Depression. Read More “Matthew F. Simmons”

Department of Religion
2017-2018 Rothman Doctoral Fellow

Prea Persaud, doctoral candidate in the Department of Religion, used her 2017-2018 Rothman Doctoral Fellowship to travel to Trinidad to document Hindu temples and rituals through photography and participant-observation interviews. She also met with prominent Caribbean scholars and conducted archival research at the National Archives of Trinidad, the University of the West Indies, and at the temples she visited in South Trinidad. Persaud’s research addresses the ways in which Hindu organizations have sacralized the local landscape of Trinidad by drawing on two different types of memory, one personal and one collective. Read More “Prea Persaud”

Ph.D. Candidate, History
2017-2018 Tedder Family Fellow

Elyssa Gage received a Tedder Family Doctoral Fellowship for her dissertation project entitled “‘A Softer and More Durable Glory’: Justice and Colonialism in Post-Revolutionary France, 1802-1830.” This project examines narratives of justice and colonialism in the French Atlantic, specifically in Guadeloupe and the metropole, in the wake of the French and Haitian Revolutions.<!–more–>

With funding from the Tedder Fellowship and a CLAS dissertation research award, Gage spent six weeks at the Archives Nationales d’Outre-Mer in Aix-en-Provence conducting the final research for the first half of her dissertation. One of the guiding questions throughout this project has been if the Revolution was a defining moment for the nation of France, what did it mean to be a nation with colonies? The research conducted with this grant enabled Gage to formulate an answer to this based on specific practices as well as intellectual arguments.